Hecq v Commission: ECJ 14 Dec 1988

ECJ An act which is no more than a management decision, such as a reassignment of duties within an administrative unit, which does not affect an official’ s position under the Staff Regulations or infringe the principle that the post to which an official is assigned should correspond to his grade, does not constitute an act adversely affecting the official within the meaning of Article 25 of the Staff Regulations.
Such an act falls within the discretionary power which each administration has to allocate duties among the members of its staff . The administration is not in that case obliged to give the official concerned a hearing or to state the grounds on which the decision is based .

Citations:

C-280/87, [1988] EUECJ C-280/87

Links:

Bailii

Jurisdiction:

European

Administrative

Updated: 23 May 2022; Ref: scu.134715

Horeau and Others, Regina (on The Application of) v Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs: Admn 12 Aug 2016

Renewed application for permission to bring judicial review of a consultation exercise carried out by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office as part of its British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT) policy review.

Judges:

Andrews J

Citations:

[2016] EWHC 2102 (Admin)

Links:

Bailii

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

International, Administrative

Updated: 23 May 2022; Ref: scu.568836

Regina (Dr Heath) v Home Office Policy and Advisory Board for Forensic Pathology: Admn 4 Aug 2005

The applicant sought judicial review of the decision of the screening body of the Home Office policy and advisory board for forensic pathology to refer his case to the full panel.
Held: Judicial review was not appropriate as a remedy at this stage. It should be used only and if necessary after the decision taken by the full tribunal. The Board itself was lawful.

Judges:

Newman J

Citations:

Times 18-Oct-2005, [2005] EWHC 1793 (Admin)

Links:

Bailii

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Cited by:

CitedGeneral Medical Council v Professor Sir Roy Meadow, Attorney General CA 26-Oct-2006
The GMC appealed against the dismissal of its proceedings for professional misconduct against the respondent doctor, whose expert evidence to a criminal court was the subject of complaint. The doctor said that the evidence given by him was . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative

Updated: 23 May 2022; Ref: scu.231183

Regina (A) v Liverpool City Council: QBD 26 Jun 2007

The applicant sought judicial review of the authority’s decision that he was over the age of eighteen.
Held: Review was granted. The authority had to have regard to all the relevant information, and could not limit itself to adopting the opinion of one dental expert.

Judges:

Walker J

Citations:

Times 01-Aug-2007

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Citing:

CitedRegina (B) v Merton London Borough Council Admn 14-Jul-2003
The authority had to decide the age of the applicant, an asylum seeker, in order to decide whether a duty was owed to him under the Act. He complained that the procedure adopted was unfair. The 2002 Act did not apply to persons under 18, and he . .
CitedRegina (T) v Enflield London Borough Council 2005
. .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative

Updated: 21 May 2022; Ref: scu.258523

Steed v Secretary of State for the Home Department: HL 26 May 2000

The claimant surrendered guns and ammunition under the 1997 Act, and was due to be compensated. His claim was not settled, and he commenced an action in the County Court for the sums claimed. The defendant denied any duty to pay up within a reasonable period, and asserted that any claim must be by way of judicial review. The defendant appealed and lost the case in the Court of Appeal, and appealed again.
Held: It was possible for a citizen to claim by way of summons sums due to him after the confiscation of his handguns, where the delay became unreasonable. There was no need to begin such proceedings by judicial review where the issue was not so much a decision, but rather the failure to deliver a statutory requirement within a reasonable time. Payment for scheduled types of handguns could be made within 30 days, and for guns which required individual valuation, 60 days was reasonable.

Judges:

Lord Slynn of Hadley Lord Woolf M.R. Lord Hope of Craighead Lord Clyde Lord Millett

Citations:

Times 26-May-2000, Gazette 08-Jun-2000, [2000] UKHL 32, [2000] 3 All ER 226, [2000] 1 WLR 1169

Links:

House of Lords, Bailii

Statutes:

Firearms (Amendment) Act 1997, Firearms Act 1968 5

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Citing:

Appeal fromSteed v Secretary of State for Home Office CA 1-May-1998
The plaintiff claimed compensation after surrendering his firearm and ammunition. There had been a long delay in processing the claim, and he sued. The Home Office entered a defence denying that there was any obligation to process claims within a . .
CitedRye, Henson and J B Trustees Limited Trustees of Dennis Rye Pension Fund v Sheffield City Council and Frederick Henson and Rye (the Trustees of the Dennis Rye 1992 Grandchildren Settlement Fund) v Sheffield City Council CA 31-Jul-1997
Courts must not get tied up in public law/private law judicial review or other arguments when remedies and results provided by both jurisdictions are similar. The guidelines set down involved: ‘not only considering the technical questions of the . .
CitedO’Reilly v Mackman HL 1982
Remission of Sentence is a Privilege not a Right
The plaintiffs had begun their action, to challenge their loss of remission as prisoners, by means of a writ, rather than by an action for judicial review, and so had sidestepped the requirement for the action to be brought within strict time . .
CitedCocks v Thanet District Council HL 25-Nov-1981
The applicant had been given temporary accomodation under the Act. He sought to enforce the obligation on the respondent to house him permanently by an action in the county court. The authority said the action should have been by judicial review. . .
CitedMercury Communications Ltd v Director General of Telecommunications and Another HL 10-Feb-1995
The Secretary of State’s decision on the grant of a Telecommunications licence was challengeable by Summons and not by Judicial Review. A dispute between Mercury and BT as to charges as set by the Director General is a private not a public dispute. . .
CitedRoy v Kensington and Chelsea and Westminster Family Practitioner Committee HL 6-Feb-1992
The respondent had withheld part of the plaintiff’s GP payments saying that he had failed to devote himself full time to his practice. The plaintiff sued, and the defendant sought to strike out his application, saying that his application had to be . .

Cited by:

CitedPhonographic Performance Limited v Department of Trade and Industry HM Attorney General ChD 23-Jul-2004
The claimant represented the interests of copyright holders, and complained that the defendant had failed to implement the Directive properly, leaving them unable properly to collect royalties in the music rental market. The respondent argued that . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative, Judicial Review

Updated: 20 May 2022; Ref: scu.89525

Stevenage Borough Football Club Ltd v The Football League Ltd: ChD 1 Aug 1996

The Football League is a body subject to judicial review, since it exercises its control over members in the public interest.

Citations:

Times 01-Aug-1996

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Cited by:

Appeal fromStevenage Borough Football Club Limited v Football League Limited CA 6-Aug-1996
Unfair changes to the rules for the promotion of sports clubs between leagues could not be challenged retrospectively after the team in question had impliedly accepted the rules. An injunction granted may within a sporting league context have unfair . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative, Judicial Review

Updated: 20 May 2022; Ref: scu.89547

Regina v Immigration Appeal Tribunal, ex Parte Jeyeanthan: Admn 3 Apr 1998

An appeal by the Home Secretary against a ruling that he had to use the same prescribed form as would be used by the asylum seeker. The use of a letter which omitted a substantial and important declaration was invalid. Lord Woolf MR made plain the court’s general reluctance to hold that the effect of failure to comply with a procedural requirement is to render proceedings null: ‘what can be the very undesirable consequences of a procedural requirement which is made so fundamental that any departure from the requirement makes everything that happens thereafter irreversibly a nullity’.

Judges:

Sedley J

Citations:

Times 23-Apr-1998, [1998] EWHC Admin 395

Statutes:

Asylum (Appeals) Procedure Rules 1993 No 1661 22(3)

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Cited by:

Appeal fromRegina v Secretary of State for the Home Department Ex Parte Jeyeanthan; Ravichandran v Secretary of State for the Home Department CA 21-May-1999
The applicant had failed to comply with the Rules in not using the form prescribed for appliying for leave to appeal against a special adjudicator’s decision to the Immigration Appeal Tribunal. The application, by letter, included all the relevant . .
CitedSeal v Chief Constable of South Wales Police CA 19-May-2005
Mr Seal noisily objected to a neighbour blocking in his car. Police were called who took him into custody under the 1983 Act. He was released several days later, and eventually sought damages for his wrongful treatment. He had failed to first seek . .
CitedSeal v Chief Constable of South Wales Police HL 4-Jul-2007
The claimant had sought to bring proceedings against the respondent, but as a mental patient subject to the 1983 Act, had been obliged by the section first to obtain consent. The parties disputed whether the failure was a procedural or substantial . .
CitedMcKay, Regina (on the Application of) v First Secretary of State and Another CA 9-Jun-2005
An enforcement notice was challenged on the grounds of it having been made without the appropriate identification of the land at issue. . .
CitedSK, Regina (on the Application of) v Secretary of State for the Home Department Admn 25-Jan-2008
The claimant was a Zimbabwean National who was to be removed from the country. He was unlawfully held in detention pending removal. He sought damages for false imprisonment. He had been held over a long period pending decisions in the courts on the . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Immigration, Administrative

Updated: 20 May 2022; Ref: scu.86923

Regina v Medicines Control Agency Ex Parte Pharma Nord Ltd: QBD 11 Jul 1997

A Court reviewing a decision of the Medicines Control Agency does not decide whether the product is a medicine, but whether the decision had been properly reached.

Judges:

Collins J

Citations:

Times 29-Jul-1997, [1997] EWHC Admin 674

Links:

Bailii

Cited by:

Appeal fromRegina v Medicines Control Agency ex parte Pharma Nord Ltd CA 10-Jun-1998
Once the Medicines Control Agency has decided that a product is a medicinal product and licensable as such, the courts should not seek to substitute their own judgment. Residuary discretion for declaration not used. . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Health, Licensing, Administrative

Updated: 19 May 2022; Ref: scu.87315

Regina v Manchester Crown Court, ex parte McCann and others: QBD 22 Nov 2000

An application for an anti-social behaviour order against an individual was a civil, not a criminal proceeding. The standard of evidence required was on the balance of probability; the civil standard. Such proceedings were not subject to the additional protection of the human rights convention. Necessarily, the circumstances from which protection was sought were ones where proof will not be easily found. There is no overriding test within domestic law for deciding whether proceedings are civil or criminal. The procedure here was one generally used for civil proceedings, and no punishment was properly involved at this stage. At most there would be a restriction on activities of those subject to the order. Lord Woolf said: ‘The significance of whether the proceedings are civil or criminal arises because of the difficulty that exists in relation to the proof of the sort of conduct against which section 1 is designed to provide protection. Understandably, in a locality those who are subject to anti-social behaviour are chary about giving evidence in criminal proceedings. It is in particular because of those difficulties that, after a consultation process, the legislation which is contained in Part 1 of the 1998 Act was passed. The object of making the proof of conduct which is anti-social more easy to prove would be defeated if in fact the proceedings were criminal. Then the normal rules of evidence which apply to criminal proceedings would have to be complied with and furthermore the proceedings would be subject to the additional protection provided by Article 6 of the European Convention in relation to criminal proceedings.’

Judges:

Lord Woolf

Citations:

Gazette 11-Jan-2001, Times 22-Dec-2000, [2002] 3 WLR 1313, [2000] EWHC 565 (QB)

Links:

Bailii

Statutes:

Crime and Disorder Act 1998 1, European Convention on Human Rights 5.1

Citing:

CitedRegina v Manchester Crown Court ex parte Rogers (Legal Professional Privilege) Admn 2-Feb-1999
The police had sought disclosure from the applicant’s solicitors of records of the time at which the applicant arrived at the solicitors’ premises on a particular date and like documents.
Held: Such records are not privileged because they did . .

Cited by:

Appeal fromRegina (McCann and Others) v Manchester Crown Court CA 9-Mar-2001
Proceedings applying for an anti-social behaviour order, were properly civil proceedings, with civil standards of evidence, and the Human Rights Act provisions relating to criminal proceedings, were not applicable either. The section included acts . .
CitedRegina (Smith) v Parole Board (No 2) CA 31-Jul-2003
The applicant having been released on licence had his licence revoked. The decision had been made at a hearing which considered evidence on paper only, which he said was unfair.
Held: The case law had maintained a proper distinction between . .
At First InstanceClingham (formerly C (a minor)) v Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea; Regina v Crown Court at Manchester Ex parte McCann and Others HL 17-Oct-2002
The applicants had been made subject of anti-social behaviour orders. They challenged the basis upon which the orders had been made.
Held: The orders had no identifiable consequences which would make the process a criminal one. Civil standards . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Crime, Administrative, Human Rights

Updated: 19 May 2022; Ref: scu.87261

Regina v Lands Tribunal, Ex Parte Jafton Properties Ltd: COL 31 Jul 2000

After a tribunal application, the applicant submitted his costs for taxation. After the hearing there was further correspondence about the decision, resulting in the applicant formally objecting to the taxation. He suggested that the correspondence after the award meant that taxation had not been concluded. It was held that he was out of time. The taxation award had all the elements necessary to make it final, and the President’s refusal of extension of time was not irrational or unreasonable. The reasons were succinct, but correct.

Judges:

Langley J

Citations:

Gazette 31-Aug-2000, [2000] EWHC Admin 384

Links:

Bailii

Statutes:

Lands Tribunal Rules 1996 (1996 No 1022) 52

Costs, Administrative, Land

Updated: 19 May 2022; Ref: scu.87117

Practice Statement (Supreme Court: Judgments): LCJ 23 Apr 1998

Sets out new arrangements under which judgments in the High Court and Court of Appeal are to be handed down. Copies available to parties first in order to spot need for corrections.

Citations:

Times 23-Apr-1998, [1998] 1 WLR 825

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Cited by:

CitedRobinson v Fernsby, Scott-Kilvert CA 19-Dec-2003
The judge had drafted his judgment and sent the drafts to the parties for comment. He then received additional written representations from one party, from which he realised that he had made an error, and issued a corrected judgment which a . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative

Updated: 19 May 2022; Ref: scu.85004

Modahl v British Athletics Federation: HL 23 Jul 1999

An athlete’s governing body was not in breach of contract to a member athlete by suspending her in accordance with its rules after a positive drug test. It was accepted that the faults in the registration of the drug testing centre with another governing body were not known to the defendants, and would not directly affect the suspension under this contract.

Judges:

Lord Chancellor Lord Nicholls of Birjkenhead Lord Hoffmann Lord Clyde Lord Millett

Citations:

Times 23-Jul-1999, [1999] UKHL 37

Links:

House of Lords, Bailii

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Citing:

Appeal fromModahl v British Athletic Federation Limited CA 28-Jul-1997
Lord Woolf MR said: ‘The question of whether a complaint about the conduct of a disciplinary committee gives rise to a remedy in public law or private law or is often difficult to determine. However the complaint in both cases would be based on an . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Contract, Administrative

Updated: 19 May 2022; Ref: scu.83781

Chief Adjudication Officer and Another v Foster: HL 7 Apr 1993

The Social Security Commissioners have the jurisdiction and power to decide if a Regulation is ultra vires the powers under which it purports to have been made.
Lord Bridge said of the Social Security Commissioners: ‘My conclusion is that the commissioners have undoubted jurisdiction to determine any challenge to the vires of a provision in regulations made by the Secretary of State as being beyond the scope of the enabling power whenever it is necessary to do so in determining whether a decision under appeal was erroneous in point of law. I am pleased to reach that conclusion for two reasons First, it avoids a cumbrous duplicity of proceedings which could only add to the already overburdened list of applications for judicial review awaiting determination by the Divisional Court. Second, it is, in my view, highly desirable that when the Court of Appeal, or indeed your Lordships House, are called upon to determine an issue of the kind in question they should have the benefit of the views upon it of one or more of the commissioners who have great expertise in this somewhat esoteric area of the law’.

Judges:

Lord Bridge

Citations:

Gazette 07-Apr-1993, [1993] AC 754, [1993] 2 WLR 292, [1993] 1 All ER 705

Statutes:

Social Security Act 1975 22(4)

Cited by:

CitedBoddington v British Transport Police HL 2-Apr-1998
The defendant had been convicted, under regulations made under the Act, of smoking in a railway carriage. He sought to challenge the validity of the regulations themselves. He wanted to argue that the power to ban smoking on carriages did not . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Benefits, Administrative

Updated: 19 May 2022; Ref: scu.79024

Brooks v Civil Aviation Authority and Another: IHCS 28 Jul 2000

When the Pensions Ombudsman carried out an investigation under the Act, he was entitled to act on the information already gathered, and had no obligation to undertake a new factual enquiry. The issues in this case had been litigated repeatedly, and the ombudsman had a wide discretion as to the conduct of his investigation of the complaint, and in this case his decision could not be faulted.

Citations:

Times 28-Jul-2000

Financial Services, Administrative, Scotland

Updated: 18 May 2022; Ref: scu.78678

Merricks and Another v Nott-Bower: CA 1964

The plaintiff police officers had been disciplined by transfer in 1957 as a result of a report by an officer who was subsequently discredited. After their accuser was discredited they sought a declaration that the disciplinary action taken against them had been taken contrary to natural justice.
Held: Lord Denning MR said that: ‘It is asked: what use can such declarations be at this stage, when the transfer took place six and a half years ago? What good does it do now? There can be no question of reopening the transfers . . on this point we have been referred to a number of cases which show how greatly the power to grant a declaration has been widened in recent years. If a real question is involved, which is not merely theoretical, and on which the court’s gives practical guidance, then the court in its discretion can grant a declaration.’ and ‘Such being the case made, I am not prepared to say that it is unarguable. It is a well-known principle of our law that any powers conferred by statute or regulation on an executive or administrative authority must be exercised in good faith for the purpose for which they are granted. They must not be misused or abused by being applied to an ulterior purpose. Whether that principle applies here or not, I do not say; all I do say is that, if the plaintiffs allege, as they did that this was a misuse of the power of transfer that it was used, not for the purpose of good administration and efficiency but for the motive of punishment they have an arguable case which they are entitled to have tried by the courts.’

Judges:

Lord Denning MR

Citations:

[1964] 1 All ER 717, [1965] 1 QB 57, [1965] 2 WLR 702

Cited by:

CitedWilliams v Home Office (No 2) 2-Jan-1981
The plaintiff prisoner had been transferred from ordinary prison to a special control unit which had been established at the prison as a means of containing and controlling prisoners who were considered to be troublemakers and inducing them to . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Litigation Practice, Administrative

Updated: 18 May 2022; Ref: scu.374246

The King v Mitchell: 1913

The court considered the meaning of section 9 of the 1875 Act which read: ‘Where a person is accused before a Court of summary jurisdiction of any offence made punishable by this Act, and for which a penalty amounting to twenty pounds, or imprisonment, is imposed, the accused may, on appearing before the Court of summary jurisdiction, declare that he objects to being tried for such offence by a Court of summary jurisdiction, and thereupon the Court of summary jurisdiction may deal with the case in all respects as if the accused were charged with an indictable offence and not an offence punishable on summary conviction, and the offence may be prosecuted on indictment accordingly.’
Held: A declaration of objection to being tried by a Court of summary jurisdiction was duly made by a person accused of an offence made punishable by the Act who was entitled to object. Accordingly he had a right to trial by jury and that the justices were bound to give effect to his claim and had no jurisdiction to try the case.

Citations:

[1913] 1 KB 561

Statutes:

Conspiracy and Protection of Property Act 1875 9

Cited by:

CitedPadfield v Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food HL 14-Feb-1968
Exercise of Ministerial Discretion
The Minister had power to direct an investigation in respect of any complaint as to the operation of any marketing scheme for agricultural produce. Milk producers complained about the price paid by the milk marketing board for their milk when . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative, Magistrates

Updated: 18 May 2022; Ref: scu.272549

Regina v Ministry of Defence Ex Parte Smith and Others: QBD 7 Jun 1995

An MOD ban on employing homosexuals was not Wednesbury unreasonable, even though it might be out of date. Pannick (counsel for the applicant, approved): ‘The court may not interfere with the exercise of an administrative discretion on substantive grounds save where the court is satisfied that the decision is unreasonable in the sense that it is beyond the range of responses open to a reasonable decision-maker. But in judging whether the decision-maker has exceeded this margin of appreciation the human rights context is important. The more substantial the interference with human rights, the more the court will require by way of justification before it is satisfied that the decision is reasonable in the sense outlined above.’ After referring to changes of attitude in society towards same-sex relationships: ‘I regard the progressive development and refinement of public and professional opinion at home and abroad, here very briefly described, as an important feature of this case. A belief which represented unquestioned orthodoxy in year X may have become questionable by year Y and unsustainable by year Z. Public and professional opinion are a continuum.’
Sir Thomas Bingham MR: ‘It is, inevitably, common ground that the United Kingdom’s obligation, [under article 8] binding in international law, to respect and secure compliance with this article is not one that is enforceable by domestic courts. The relevance of the Convention in the present context is as background to the complaint of irrationality. The fact that a decision-maker failed to take account of convention obligations when exercising an administrative discretion is not of itself a ground for impugning that exercise of discretion.’

Judges:

Simon Brown LJ and Curtis J

Citations:

Times 13-Jun-1995, Independent 08-Jun-1995

Statutes:

European Convention on Human Rights 8

Citing:

CitedAssociated Provincial Picture Houses Ltd v Wednesbury Corporation CA 10-Nov-1947
Administrative Discretion to be Used Reasonably
The applicant challenged the manner of decision making as to the conditions which had been attached to its licence to open the cinema on Sundays. It had not been allowed to admit children under 15 years of age. The statute provided no appeal . .

Cited by:

Appeal fromRegina v Secretary of State for Defence Ex Parte Smith; Regina v Same Ex Parte Grady Etc CA 6-Nov-1995
A ban on homosexuals serving in the armed forces was not irrational, and the challenge to the ban failed. The greater the policy content of a decision, and the more remote the subject matter of a decision from ordinary judicial experience, the more . .
CitedRegina v Secretary of State for Home Department ex parte Turgut CA 28-Jan-2000
When the Court of Appeal was asked to look at the decision of the Home Secretary on an appeal to him for asylum, the court should investigate the factual circumstances which lay behind the decision. The court must follow the practice of the European . .
CitedRegina v Secretary of State for Home Department ex parte Turgut CA 28-Jan-2000
When the Court of Appeal was asked to look at the decision of the Home Secretary on an appeal to him for asylum, the court should investigate the factual circumstances which lay behind the decision. The court must follow the practice of the European . .
CitedCumming and others v Chief Constable of Northumbria Police CA 17-Dec-2003
The six claimants sought damages for wrongful arrest and false imprisonment. Each had been arrested on an officer’s suspicion. They operated CCTV equipment, and it appeared that tapes showing the commission of an offence had been tampered with. Each . .
CitedFitzpatrick v Sterling Housing Association Ltd HL 28-Oct-1999
Same Sex Paartner to Inherit as Family Member
The claimant had lived with the original tenant in a stable and long standing homosexual relationship at the deceased’s flat. After the tenant’s death he sought a statutory tenancy as a spouse of the deceased. The Act had been extended to include as . .
CitedRegina v Secretary of State for The Home Department Ex Parte Simms HL 8-Jul-1999
Ban on Prisoners talking to Journalists unlawful
The two prisoners, serving life sentences for murder, had had their appeals rejected. They continued to protest innocence, and sought to bring their campaigns to public attention through the press, having oral interviews with journalists without . .
CitedRegina v Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs ex parte Manelfi Admn 25-Oct-1996
The applicant sought judicial review of the defendant’s refusal to employ him to work at GCHQ, which had a policy not to employ anyone with non-British parents save exceptionally. The claimant said this was racially discriminatory.
Held: The . .
CitedRogers, Regina (on the Application of) v Swindon NHS Primary Care Trust CA 12-Apr-2006
The claimant challenged the policy of her local health authority not to allow prescription to her of the drug Herceptin.
Held: The policy had not been settled upon lawfully and was to be set aside. On the one hand the PCT developed a policy . .
CitedHuang v Secretary of State for the Home Department HL 21-Mar-2007
Appellate Roles – Human Rights – Families Split
The House considered the decision making role of immigration appellate authorities when deciding appeals on Human Rights grounds, against refusal of leave to enter or remain, under section 65. In each case the asylum applicant had had his own . .
Appeal fromRegina v Ministry of Defence ex parte Smith; ex parte Grady CA 3-Nov-1995
Four appellants challenged the policy of the ministry to discharge homosexuals from the armed services.
Held: Where a measure affects fundamental rights or has profoundly intrusive effects, the courts will anxiously scrutinise the decision to . .
CitedBancoult, Regina (on the Application of) v Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (No 2) HL 22-Oct-2008
The claimants challenged the 2004 Order which prevented their return to their homes on the Chagos Islands. The islanders had been taken off the island to leave it for use as a US airbase. In 2004, the island was no longer needed, and payment had . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Employment, Administrative, Human Rights, Discrimination, Armed Forces

Updated: 17 May 2022; Ref: scu.87365

Aparau v Iceland Frozen Foods Plc: CA 12 Nov 1999

Where a case had been remitted by the EAT to a tribunal for reconsideration in respect of matters specified by the EAT, the tribunal’s consideration was to be limited to those matters remitted. It was not open to the tribunal to consider matters outside the scope of the elements remitted. ‘The effect of an order remitting a case to a tribunal which had otherwise exhausted its jurisdiction was considered by this court in the context of arbitral proceedings in Interbulk Ltd v Aiden Shipping Co Ltd (The ‘Vimeira’ (No.1)) [1985] 2 Lloyd’s Rep. 410. Ackner L.J. pointed out that the extent to which the tribunal’s jurisdiction is revived in consequence of an order remitting the matter to it depends entirely on the scope of the remission. If, as occurred in the present case, the matter is remitted for the tribunal to consider certain specific issues, it will have no jurisdiction to hear or determine matters outside the scope of those issues and it must follow that it has no power to allow one party to amend its case to raise issues which were not previously before it. In the present case it is clear from the passages in the judgment of the Employment Appeal Tribunal to which I have already referred that remission was ordered in very limited terms simply to enable the industrial tribunal to reconsider whether Iceland’s new terms of employment had been accepted by Mrs Aparau. That being so, the tribunal did not by virtue of the remission have jurisdiction to reopen the case generally, nor did it have jurisdiction to hear or determine any argument on the part of Iceland relating to the fairness of any dismissal. Although Mr Glennie sought to persuade us to the contrary, I for my part am quite satisfied that that was not an issue which had previously been raised in the proceedings and it was certainly not within the scope of the remission.’

Judges:

Moore-Bick J, Peter Gibson, Mance LJJ

Citations:

Times 12-Nov-1999, Gazette 25-Nov-1999, Gazette 01-Dec-1999, [2000] ICR 341, [2000] IRLR 196, [1999] EWCA Civ 3047, [2000] 1 All ER 228

Links:

Bailii

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Citing:

See AlsoAparau v Iceland Frozen Foods Plc EAT 9-Oct-1995
. .
CitedAiden Shipping Co Ltd v Interbulk Ltd (The ‘Vimeira’) HL 1986
Wide Application of Costs Against Third Party
A claim had been made against charterers by the ship owners, and in turn by the charterers against their sub-charterers. Notice of motion were issued after arbitration awards were not accepted. When heard, costs awards were made, which were now . .
See AlsoAparau v Iceland Frozen Foods Plc EAT 13-Oct-1997
. .
Appeal fromAparau v Iceland Frozen Foods Plc EAT 12-Mar-1998
. .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Employment, Administrative

Updated: 17 May 2022; Ref: scu.77830

Regina v Inner London Education Authority, ex parte Westminster City Council: 1986

A political purpose can taint an administrative decision with impropriety.

Judges:

Glidewell J

Citations:

[1986] 1 All ER 19

Cited by:

CitedRegina v Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs ex Parte the World Development Movement Ltd Admn 10-Nov-1994
The Movement sought to challenge decisions of the Secretary of state to give economic aid to the Pergau Dam, saying that it was not required ‘for the purpose of promoting the development’ of Malaysia. It was said to be uneconomic and damaging. It . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative, Local Government

Updated: 17 May 2022; Ref: scu.262974

Regina v Assistant Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis ex parte Howell: 1986

After twelve years a London cab driver’s licence was not renewed on medical grounds.
Held: His challenge succeeded because he had been given no opportunity to make representations about the matters said to have concerned the decision-makers. An order that the matter be reconsidered and decided afresh.

Citations:

(1986) RTR 52

Cited by:

CitedNaidike, Naidike and Naidike v The Attorney General of Trinidad and Tobago PC 12-Oct-2004
(Trinidad and Tobago) The claimant was arrested following expiry of the last of his work permits and after he had failed to provide evidence of his intention to leave. As he was arrested he was also arrested for assaulting a police officer. He was . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative, Road Traffic

Updated: 17 May 2022; Ref: scu.237243

Regina v Commissioner for Local Administration ex parte Croydon London Borough Council: QBD 1989

Delay in application.
Held: The commissioner’s powers cannot depend upon whether the complaint is well founded. He could only act where a complainant did not otherwise have an action at law for a remedy.
As long as no prejudice is caused, the courts will not rely on these provisions to deprive a litigant who has behaved sensibly and reasonably of relief to which he is otherwise entitled.
Woolf LJ said: ‘ . . if the complaint was justified, the person concerned might be entitled to obtain some form of remedy in respect of the subject matter of the complaint if he had commenced proceedings within the appropriate time limits. The commissioner is not concerned to consider whether in fact the proceedings would succeed.’

Judges:

Woolf LJ

Citations:

[1989] 1 All ER 1033, [1989] COD 226, [1989] Fam Law 187

Statutes:

Local Government Act 1974

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Cited by:

MentionedRegina (Smeaton) v Secretary of State for Health and Others Admn 18-Apr-2002
The claimant challenged the Order as regards the prescription of the morning-after pill, asserting that the pill would cause miscarriages, and that therefore the use would be an offence under the 1861 Act.
Held: ‘SPUC’s case is that any . .
CitedJR55, Re Application for Judicial Review (Northern Ireland) SC 11-May-2016
The Court was asked about the powers of the Complaints Commissioner under the 1996 Order, and in particular about his powers in relation to general medical practitioners working in the National Health Service and whether, and if so in what . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Local Government, Administrative

Updated: 16 May 2022; Ref: scu.223701

Wordie Property Co Limited v Secretary of State for Scotland: 1984

To demonstrate an error of law in a decision, the petitioner is required to show that the decision maker had failed to take into account a consideration which was both relevant and material.

Judges:

Lord President Emslie

Citations:

1984 SLT 345

Jurisdiction:

Scotland

Cited by:

CitedMohammadi v Advocate General Scotland HCJ 2-May-2003
The applicant had claimed asylum. His claim had been rejected and an order made for repatriation to Iran. His appeal was lodged two days out of time. He appealed its rejection. The solicitors accepted full responsibility for the delay.
Held: . .
CitedLand Securities Group Plc v Scottish Ministers and others HL 25-Oct-2006
Objection had been made to a proposed shopping centre on the site of the former Ravenscraig steel mills, saying that it would provide excess capacity and went against the policy that priority should be given to permissions for town centres. The plan . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative

Updated: 16 May 2022; Ref: scu.181862

Rex v Port of London Authority Ex parte Kynoch Ltd: CA 1919

Bankes LJ said: ‘There are on the one hand cases where a tribunal in the honest exercise of its discretion has adopted a policy, and, without refusing to hear an applicant, intimates to him what its policy is, and that after hearing him it will in accordance with its policy decide against him, unless there is something exceptional in his case. I think counsel for the applicants would admit that, if the policy has been adopted for reasons which the tribunal may legitimately entertain, no objection could be taken to such a course. On the other hand there are cases where a tribunal has passed a rule, or come to a determination, not to hear any application of a particular character by whomsoever made. There is a wide distinction to be drawn between these two classes.’

Judges:

Bankes LJ

Citations:

[1919] 1 KB 176

Cited by:

CitedBritish Oxygen Co Ltd v Board of Trade HL 15-Jul-1970
Cylinders containing hydrogen gas were being put on a trailer pulled by a tractor for the purpose of delivery to the premises of the purchaser. One of the issues before the court was whether the function of the hydrogen trailers and the cylinders . .
CitedSandiford, Regina (on The Application of) v The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs SC 16-Jul-2014
The appellant a British Citizen awaited execution in Singapore after conviction on a drugs charge. The only way she might get legal help for a further appeal would be if she was given legal aid by the respondent. She sought assistance both on Human . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative

Updated: 16 May 2022; Ref: scu.551695

Regina v Secretary of State for Trade and Industry Ex Parte Duddridge and Others: QBD 4 Oct 1994

Secretary of State was under no duty to issue regulations to protect against low level electromagnetic radiation.

Citations:

Independent 04-Oct-1994

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Citing:

Appealed toRegina v Secretary of State for Trade and Industry Ex Parte Duddridge and Others CA 20-Oct-1995
The Maastricht environmental commitment imposed no binding obligation on a government of itself. The unproven possibility of a medical effect of radiation from power supply lines was no justification for new rules. . .

Cited by:

Appeal fromRegina v Secretary of State for Trade and Industry Ex Parte Duddridge and Others CA 20-Oct-1995
The Maastricht environmental commitment imposed no binding obligation on a government of itself. The unproven possibility of a medical effect of radiation from power supply lines was no justification for new rules. . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative, Environment

Updated: 16 May 2022; Ref: scu.87952

Rex v Port of London Authority: 1919

A tribunal may, in the honest exercise of its discretion, adopt a policy, and announce it to those concerned, so long as it is ready to listen to reasons why, in an exceptional case, that policy should not be applied.

Judges:

Lord Justice Bankes

Citations:

[1919] 1 QB 184

Cited by:

CitedSchmidt and Another v Secretary of State for Home Affairs CA 19-Dec-1968
The plaintiffs had come to England to study at a college run by the Church of Scientology, and now complained that their student visas had not been extended so as to allow them to complete their studies. They said that the decision had been made for . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative

Updated: 15 May 2022; Ref: scu.516248

Sheffield and Horsham v The United Kingdom: ECHR 30 Jul 1998

It is within a nation’s margin of appreciation to refuse to re-register birth details of people who had undergone sex-changes. Similarly it was not a human rights infringement not to allow post operative trans-sexuals to marry. However the court was critical of the United Kingdom’s apparent failure to take any steps to keep this area of the law under review. There is, the court said, an increased social acceptance of trans-sexualism and an increased recognition of the problems which post-operative transsexual people encounter. The court reiterated that this area ‘needs to be kept under review by Contracting States’
Hudoc No violation of Art. 8; No violation of Art. 12; No violation of Art. 14+8; Not necessary to examine Art. 13

Citations:

Times 04-Sep-1998, 22985/93, 23390/94, (1998) 27 EHRR 163, [1998] ECHR 69

Links:

Worldlii

Statutes:

European Convention on Human Rights Art 8, 12

Jurisdiction:

Human Rights

Citing:

CitedCossey v The United Kingdom ECHR 27-Sep-1990
A male to female transsexual who had undergone full gender reassignment surgery wished to marry. The court held that despite the Resolution of the European Parliament on 12th September 1989 and Recommendation 1117 adopted by the Parliamentary . .
CitedRees v The United Kingdom ECHR 17-Oct-1986
The applicant had been born and registered as a female, but later came to receive treatment and to live as a male. He complained that the respondent had failed to amend his birth certificate.
Held: The court accepted that, by failing to confer . .
CitedCorbett v Corbett (otherwise Ashley) FD 1-Feb-1970
There had been a purported marriage in 1963 between a man and a male to female trans-sexual.
Held: Because marriage is essentially a union between a man and a woman, the relationship depended on sex, and not on gender. The law should adopt the . .

Cited by:

CitedBellinger v Bellinger HL 10-Apr-2003
Transgender Male to Female not to marry as Female
The parties had gone through a form of marriage, but Mrs B had previously undergone gender re-assignment surgery. Section 11(c) of the 1973 Act required a marriage to be between a male and a female. It was argued that the section was incompatible . .
CitedStott (Procurator Fiscal, Dunfermline) and Another v Brown PC 5-Dec-2000
The system under which the registered keeper of a vehicle was obliged to identify herself as the driver, and such admission was to be used subsequently as evidence against her on a charge of driving with excess alcohol, was not a breach of her right . .
CitedA v West Yorkshire Police HL 6-May-2004
The claimant was a male to female trans-sexual who had been refused employment as a police officer by the respondent, who had said that the staturory requirement for males to search males and for females to search females would be impossible to . .
CitedGrant v The Queen PC 16-Jan-2006
(Jamaica) The defendant appealed his conviction for murder saying that the admission of an unsworn statement by one witness and the non-admission of another similar statement who did not either attend court was unconstitutional. He shot the victim . .
CitedWilkinson v Kitzinger and others FD 31-Jul-2006
The parties had gone through a ceremony of marriage in Columbia, being both women. After the relationship failed, the claimant sought a declaration that the witholding of the recognition of same-sex marriages recoginised in a foreign jurisdiction . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Human Rights, Family, Administrative

Updated: 15 May 2022; Ref: scu.165644

Emesa Sugar (Free Zone) Nv v Aruba Case C-17/98: ECJ 29 Feb 2000

It was not open to a party to a case before the European Court of Justice to seek opportunity to make written representations on opinions submitted to the Court by the Advocate General. Opinions of the Court of Human Rights that a party should have opportunity to see and comment upon all matters put before a tribunal were not applicable in this case. The role of the Advocates General was not to act in a partisan manner, and their views were given in a quasi-judicial capacity.

Citations:

Times 29-Feb-2000

Jurisdiction:

European

European, Administrative, Human Rights

Updated: 15 May 2022; Ref: scu.80310

Commissioners of Customs and Excise v Ray: ChD 14 Jun 2000

The decision to refuse a retrospective licence for the importation of antique ivory, was one for the Department of Environment Transport and the Regions, and not one for the Commissioners of Customs and Excise. An appeal against a refusal could not therefore lie to the VAT Tribunal, even though they had been seized by the Commissioners.

Citations:

Times 14-Jun-2000, Gazette 22-Jun-2000

Statutes:

Commission Regulation EC/939/97 (OJ 1997 LI40/9) Art 8(3)

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Environment, Administrative, Customs and Excise

Updated: 15 May 2022; Ref: scu.79395

Bolton Metropolitan District Council and Others v Secretary of State for the Environment and Others: HL 25 May 1995

There had been an application in 1986 for planning permission for a shopping centre in Trafford. There were two public enquiries, followed, as public policy changed by further representations. The plaintiff complained that the eventual decision letter was defective in failing to deal with issues of urban regeneration, and with reservation of areas for industrial use.
Held: The Secretary of State had to state his reasons ‘in sufficient detail to enable the reader to know what conclusion he had reached on the principal important controversial issues. To require him to refer to every material consideration, however insignificant, and to deal with every argument, however peripheral would be to impose and unjustifiable burden.’ In this case, though the decision letter was open to criticism, it had achieved the necessary standard and stood.
Lord Lloyd said: ‘In all questions to do with costs, the fundamental rule is that there are no rules. Costs are always in the discretion of the court, and a practice, however widespread and longstanding, must never be allowed to harden into a rule.’

Judges:

Lord Goff of Chievley, Lord Mustill, Lord Slynn of Hadley, Lord Lloyd of Berwick, Lord Steyn

Citations:

Times 25-May-1995, Ind Summary 10-Jul-1995, (1995) 71 P and CR 309, (1995) 1 WLR 1176

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Citing:

See alsoBolton Metropolitan District Council and Others v Secretary of State for the Environment and Others No 2 HL 17-Jul-1995
The applicants had been successful in their appeal against a refusal of planning permission. The Secretary of State had awarded himself and the applicants their costs against the Council. The Council asked the House to give guidance on the . .
Appeal fromBolton Metropolitan Borough Council and Others v Secretary of State for Environment and Others CA 4-Aug-1994
A decision maker can take a preliminary view of a matter provided that he continues to keep an open mind. . .
CitedHope v Secretary of State for the Environment 1975
. .

Cited by:

See alsoBolton Metropolitan District Council and Others v Secretary of State for the Environment and Others No 2 HL 17-Jul-1995
The applicants had been successful in their appeal against a refusal of planning permission. The Secretary of State had awarded himself and the applicants their costs against the Council. The Council asked the House to give guidance on the . .
CitedSouth Buckinghamshire District Council and Another v Porter (No 2) HL 1-Jul-2004
Mrs Porter was a Romany gipsy who bought land in the Green Belt in 1985 and lived there with her husband in breach of planning control. The inspector gave her personal permission to continue use, and it had been appealed and cross appealed on the . .
CitedHurst, Regina (on the Application of) v Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis v London Northern District Coroner HL 28-Mar-2007
The claimant’s son had been stabbed to death. She challenged the refusal of the coroner to continue with the inquest with a view to examining the responsibility of any of the police in having failed to protect him.
Held: The question amounted . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Planning, Costs, Administrative

Updated: 15 May 2022; Ref: scu.78475

Regina v Hillingdon Health Authority ex parte Goodwin: 1984

Woolf J said: ‘Whenever there has to be consultation, there has to be an indication of what there is to be consultation about; and, although an authority must enter into the consultation without a closed mind, it seems to me that there is nothing objectionable in the authority having decided on a course it would seek to adopt, if after consultation it decided that that is the proper course to adopt.’

Judges:

Woolf J

Citations:

[1984] ICR 800

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Cited by:

CitedRegina v Worcestershire Health Council (Arising From the Complaint of Kidderminster and District Community Health Council) CA 28-May-1999
The respondent had planned to downgrade a local hospital, closing the accident and emergency department. This was a renewed application for leave to seek judicial review of the plan. The health authority initially developed and had before them seven . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative

Updated: 14 May 2022; Ref: scu.224899

Three Rivers District Council v Bank of England: ComC 8 Jan 1996

Citations:

Times 08-Jan-1996

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Citing:

See AlsoThree Rivers District Council v Bank of England QBD 22-Apr-1996
In an allegation of misfeasance in public office, a complainant who says he has been affected by the alleged misfeasance, has sufficient locus standi to claim. Parliamentary materials are admissible to discover purpose of an Act, and not just in . .

Cited by:

See AlsoThree Rivers District Council v Bank of England QBD 22-Apr-1996
In an allegation of misfeasance in public office, a complainant who says he has been affected by the alleged misfeasance, has sufficient locus standi to claim. Parliamentary materials are admissible to discover purpose of an Act, and not just in . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative

Updated: 13 May 2022; Ref: scu.220789

Regina v Secretary of State for the Home Department: CA 10 Nov 1999

Where a person had been lawfully arrested, but later ordered to be released, because his continued detention was in breach of the Convention on Human Rights he could properly be denied compensation for the prior detention by the Secretary of State. There was no fault or maladministration on the part of the Home Secretary. The complainant had properly been arrested as a threat to national security and with a view to deportation.

Citations:

Times 10-Nov-1999

Statutes:

European Convention on Human Rights

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Administrative, Human Rights

Updated: 11 May 2022; Ref: scu.85509

Macharia v Secretary of State for the Home Department: CA 25 Nov 1999

The Immigration Appeal Tribunal does not have discretion, whether implied or otherwise, to admit new or further evidence without notice having first been given. The Rules explicitly required advance notice to be given, and nor was it proper for the tribunal itself to introduce evidence. The absence of a rule against such admission of evidence was not conclusive.

Citations:

Times 25-Nov-1999, Gazette 01-Dec-1999

Statutes:

Asylum (Appeals) Procedure Rules 1996 No 2070

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Immigration, Litigation Practice, Administrative

Updated: 10 May 2022; Ref: scu.83275

Forrest and Another v Towry Law Financial Services Ltd and Others: CA 25 Nov 1999

Once a writ had been issued, the Ombudsman had no standing to hear a complaint. The applicant wished to preserve his rights against the defendant in negligence but to pursue a complaint first. It was held that the writ having been issued, it would first have to be stayed, adjourned or discontinued, before the Ombudsman could accept jurisdiction on the complaint.

Citations:

Gazette 25-Nov-1999, Times 03-Dec-1999

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Administrative, Litigation Practice, Financial Services

Updated: 10 May 2022; Ref: scu.80638

Akewushola v Secretary of State for the Home Department: CA 3 Nov 1999

The chairman of an immigration tribunal has no power to rescind his own decision, or that of another chairman. Similarly a full tribunal had no such power in respect of its own or another full tribunal’s decisions. The Rules contain no such explicit power whether for a chairman or the full tribunal.

Citations:

Times 03-Nov-1999

Statutes:

Immigration Appeals (Procedure) Rules 1984 (1984 N0 2041) 42

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Administrative

Updated: 10 May 2022; Ref: scu.77699

The Secretary of State for Work and Pensions v Carmichael and Another: CA 20 Mar 2018

The court considered the aproach after the rule under which Housing Benefits had been decided had been declared unlawful.

Judges:

The President of the Queens Bench Division
(Sir Brian Leveson)
Lord Justice Flaux
And
Lord Justice Leggatt

Citations:

[2018] EWCA Civ 548, [2018] WLR(D) 176, [2018] 1 WLR 3429

Links:

Bailii, WLRD

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Cited by:

CitedRR v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions SC 13-Nov-2019
Housing benefit regulations had been found unlawful and were amended. The Court now considered what payments should have been made before the amendments came into effect.
Held: The appeal was allowed, and RR’s housing benefit entitlement is to . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Benefits, Administrative

Updated: 09 May 2022; Ref: scu.606478

Regina v Chief Constable of Thames Valley ex parte Cotton: 1990

In order:- ‘to make good a natural justice challenge an applicant must establish where there is a real, as opposed to purely minimal possibility that the outcome would have been different’ (Simon Brown J) Bingham LJ: ‘While cases may no doubt arise in which it can properly be held that denying the subject of a decision an adequate opportunity to put his case is not in all the circumstances unfair, I would expect these cases to be of great rarity. There are a number of reasons for this:- 1. Unless the subject of the decision has had the opportunity to put his case it may not be easy to knew what case he could or would have put if he had the chance. 2. As memorably pointed out by Megarry J in John v. Rees [1970] Ch 345 at page 402, experience shows that what is confidently expected is by no means always that which happens. 3. It is generally desirable that decision-makers should be reasonably receptive to argument, and it would therefore be unfortunate if a complainant’s position became weaker as the decision-maker’s mind became more closed. 4. In considering whether the complainant’s representations would have made any difference to the outcome the court may unconsciously stray from its proper province of reviewing the propriety of the decision-making process into the forbidden territory of evaluating the substantial merits of a decision. 5. This is a field in which appearances are generally thought to matter. 6. Where the decision-maker is under a duty to act fairly the subject of the decision may properly be said to have a right to be heard, and rights are not to be lightly denied’.

Judges:

Simon Brown J, Bingham LJ

Citations:

[1990] IRLR 344

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Cited by:

CitedCapenhurst and Others, Regina (on the Application Of) v Leicester City Council Admn 15-Sep-2004
The applicants, representatives of voluntary organisations, challenged decisions of the local authority to withdraw their funding, saying the decision making process had been unfair.
Held: Even if it was not bound to consult, if the authority . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Employment, Administrative

Updated: 06 May 2022; Ref: scu.213648

Regina v Local Authority and Police Authority in the Midlands, ex parte LM: 2000

The court considered the retention of information about an unsubstantiated child sexual abuse allegation.

Judges:

Dyson J

Citations:

[2000] 1 FLR 612

Statutes:

Police Act 1997 115(7)

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Cited by:

CitedRegina (X) v Chief Constable of West Midlands Police QBD 23-Jan-2004
The claimant, a social worker, had been accused of two offences of indecency with children, but the complainants had failed to identify him. The respondent later disclosed those allegations when called upon to provide an enhanced criminal record . .
CitedL, Regina (On the Application of) v Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis SC 29-Oct-2009
Rebalancing of Enhanced Disclosure Requirements
The Court was asked as to the practice of supplying enhanced criminal record certificates under the 1997 Act. It was said that the release of reports of suspicions was a disproportionate interference in the claimants article 8 rights to a private . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative

Updated: 06 May 2022; Ref: scu.193599

In re a local authority (Inquiry: restraint on publication); A Local Authority v A Health Authority and A: FD 27 Nov 2003

The authority had carried out an inquiry into its handling of an application for a care order. It sought to restrain republication of the report.
Held: There were competing requirements under the Convention. Any jurisdiction to restrain publication must be exercised in such circumstances only to protect the children involved. The scope to act for adults under a disability by letters patent or parens patriae had lapsed, but an inherent jurisdiction remained. Pending any statutory creation, the court would act through the common law doctrine of necessity. Here the action was required for protective rather than a custodial jurisdiction, and again the competing interests under the Convention had to be weighed. In both cases the requirements were met. For the children, and injunction was continued, and for the adults one was made. The balance came down in favour of protecting vulnerable adults by preventing publication of a local authority report: ‘They have had considerable and distressing disruption of their lives and are, as set out in the report, vulnerable. A period of peace, stability and a chance to settle down again after the very real upset of their lives is threatened by the likely intense media cover if this report is published. They are all under some disability but not such, as far as I know, as to prevent possibly all of them, but certainly at least 4 of them, from understanding the impact of press and other media intrusion. That intrusion would affect their daily lives and would be very likely to be disruptive, distressing and contrary to the need for them to settle back in the home. They clearly have rights under article 8 which are engaged and would be breached if the report is published. I am satisfied that publication of the report would be deeply damaging and detrimental to their welfare.
The factors supporting the rights of the vulnerable adults under article 8 have to be balanced against the right of the local authority to publish under article 10. I have found that it would be lawful on their behalf to interfere with the article 10 right of freedom of expression. I have considered very carefully whether to exercise the court’s discretion in favour of the vulnerable adults would be a disproportionate response to the contents of the report, having regard to the importance attached to article 10 by section 12 of the Human Rights Act 1998. I am also fully aware of the factors in favour of not restraining publication of volume 1. I am satisfied, however, that the balancing exercise comes down in favour of recognising the importance of the protection of the vulnerable adults by the granting of a declaration to that effect.’

Judges:

Dame Elizabeth Butler-Sloss P

Citations:

[2003] EWHC Fam 2746, Times 05-Dec-2003, Gazette 22-Jan-2004, [2004] EWHC 2746 (Fam), [2004] Fam 96, [2004] Fam Law 179, [2004] 1 FCR 113, [2004] 1 All ER 480, [2004] 2 WLR 926, (2004) 7 CCL Rep 426, (2004) 76 BMLR 210, [2004] BLGR 117, [2004] 1 FLR 541

Links:

Bailii

Statutes:

European Convention on Human Rights 8 10

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Citing:

CitedIn re F (Mental Patient: Sterilisation) HL 4-May-1989
Where a patient lacks capacity, there is the power to provide him with whatever treatment or care is necessary in his own best interests. Medical treatment can be undertaken in an emergency even if, through a lack of capacity, no consent had been . .

Cited by:

CitedE v Channel Four, News International Ltd and St Helens Borough Council FD 1-Jun-2005
The applicant sought an order restraining publication by the defendants of material, saying she did not have capacity to consent to the publication. She suffered a multiple personality disorder. She did herself however clearly wish the film to be . .
CitedIn re PS (an Adult), Re; City of Sunderland v PS by her litigation friend the Offcial Solcicitor and CA; Re PS (Incapacitated or Vulnerable Adult) FD 9-Mar-2007
The patient an elderly lady with limited mental capacity was to be returned from hospital, but her daughter said she was to come home. The local authority sought to prevent this, wanting to return her to a residential unit where she had lived for . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Children, Administrative, Media, Local Government, Human Rights, Information

Updated: 05 May 2022; Ref: scu.188626

Blackpool Corporation v Locker: CA 1948

The effect of the delegation of a power is that the power in question is exercisable by the delegate and no longer by the pricipal delegator.
Scott LJ discussed the rule that ignorance of the law is no excuse: The maxim that ignorance of the law does not excuse any subject represents the working hypothesis on which the rule of law rests in British democracy. That maxim applies in legal theory just as much to written as to unwritten law, i.e., to statute law as much as to common law or equity. But the very justification for that basic maxim is that the whole of our law, written or unwritten, is accessible to the public – in the sense, of course, that, at any rate, its legal advisers have access to it, at any moment, as of right’ . . ‘John Citizen’ should not be ‘in complete ignorance of what rights over him and his property have been secretly conferred by the minister’ as otherwise ‘For practical purposes, the rule of law . . breaks down because the aggrieved subject’s remedy is gravely impaired’.’

Judges:

Scott LJ

Citations:

[1948] 1 KB 349, [1948] 1 All ER 85

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Cited by:

CitedReilly and Another, Regina (on The Application of) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions SC 30-Oct-2013
The Secretary of State appealed against the decision in favour of Ms Reilly and Mr Wilson, that the 2011 Regulations, made under section 17A of the 1995 Act, did not comply with the requirements of that section, and (ii) a cross-appeal brought by . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative, Agency

Updated: 04 May 2022; Ref: scu.540479

Regina v Registrar General, Ex parte Segerdal: QBD 1969

The Church of Scientology challenged the refusal of the Registrar General to register its chapel at East Grinstead as a place of meeting for religious worship.
Held: The challenge failed.

Judges:

Lord Parker CJ, Ashworth and Cantley JJ

Citations:

[1970] 1 QB 430

Statutes:

Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 2

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Cited by:

Appeal fromRegina v Registrar General, Ex parte Segerdal CA 1970
The Church of Scientology chapel at East Grinstead, Sussex was not a ‘place of meeting for religious worship’ within the meaning of section 2 of the 1855 Act since that would require reverence to a deity. The Church of Scientology’s services did not . .
CitedHodkin and Another, Regina (on The Application of) v Registrar-General of Births, Deaths and Marriages SC 11-Dec-2013
The appellants sought to be married in their regular church in London. The minister would be pleased to perform the ceremony, but church to which they belonged was part of the Church of Scientology, and had been refused registration under the 1855 . .
CitedHodkin and Another, Regina (on The Application of) v Registrar General of Births, Deaths and Marriages Admn 19-Dec-2012
The claimants, both scientologists, wanted to be married as the London Church Chapel. The respondent had declined to register it as a place of worship under the 1855 Act.
Held: The claim failed. Scientology is a religion. Counsel for the . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Family, Administrative, Ecclesiastical

Updated: 04 May 2022; Ref: scu.540526

Regina v Registrar General, Ex parte Segerdal: CA 1970

The Church of Scientology chapel at East Grinstead, Sussex was not a ‘place of meeting for religious worship’ within the meaning of section 2 of the 1855 Act since that would require reverence to a deity. The Church of Scientology’s services did not meet that test, and a valid ceremony of marriage could not be conducted there. The question of whether the services performed in the chapel are properly to be regarded as a form of religious worship is inevitably conditioned by whether Scientology is to be regarded as a religion.
Lord Denning asked whether the chapel was a place of meeting for religious worship within the meaning of the Act, saying: ‘We have had much discussion on the meaning of the word ‘religion’ and of the word ‘worship’, taken separately, but I think we should take the combined phrase, ‘place of meeting for religious worship’ as used in the statute of 1855. It connotes to my mind a place of which the principal use is as a place where people come together as a congregation or assembly to do reverence to God. It need not be the God which the Christians worship. It may be another God, or an unknown God, but it must be reverence to a deity. There may be exceptions. For instance, Buddhist temples are properly described as places of meeting for religious worship. But, apart from exceptional cases of that kind, it seems to me the governing idea behind the words ‘place of meeting for religious worship’ is that it should be a place for the worship of God. I am sure that would be the meaning attached by those who framed this legislation of 1855.’
As to how that might apply to the Church of Scientology: ‘Turning to the creed of the Church of Scientology, I must say that it seems to me to be more a philosophy of the existence of man or of life, rather than a religion. Religious worship means reverence or veneration of God or of a Supreme Being. I do not find any such reverence or veneration in the creed of this church . . When I look through the ceremonies and the affidavits, I am left with the feeling that there is nothing in it of reverence for God or a deity, but simply instruction in a philosophy. There may be belief in a spirit of man, but there is no belief in a spirit of God.’
Winn LJ said that he did not feel well qualified to discuss whether Scientology could properly be called a religion, but the evidence did not show to his mind that its adherents observed any form of worship. He explained what he meant by worship: ‘by no ‘worship’, if I am bound to define my terms, I mean to indicate that they do not humble themselves in reverence and recognition of the dominant power and control of any entity or being outside their own body and life.’
Buckley LJ said: ‘Worship I take to be something which must have some at least of the following characteristics: submission to the object worshipped, veneration of that object, praise, thanksgiving, prayer or intercession.’

Judges:

Lord Denning MR, Winn and Buckley LJJ

Citations:

[1970] 2 QB 697

Statutes:

Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 2

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Citing:

Appeal fromRegina v Registrar General, Ex parte Segerdal QBD 1969
The Church of Scientology challenged the refusal of the Registrar General to register its chapel at East Grinstead as a place of meeting for religious worship.
Held: The challenge failed. . .

Cited by:

OverruledHodkin and Another, Regina (on The Application of) v Registrar-General of Births, Deaths and Marriages SC 11-Dec-2013
The appellants sought to be married in their regular church in London. The minister would be pleased to perform the ceremony, but church to which they belonged was part of the Church of Scientology, and had been refused registration under the 1855 . .
CitedHodkin and Another, Regina (on The Application of) v Registrar General of Births, Deaths and Marriages Admn 19-Dec-2012
The claimants, both scientologists, wanted to be married as the London Church Chapel. The respondent had declined to register it as a place of worship under the 1855 Act.
Held: The claim failed. Scientology is a religion. Counsel for the . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Family, Administrative, Ecclesiastical

Updated: 04 May 2022; Ref: scu.540525

Ex Parte Newton: 19 Apr 1855

The Attorney General having refused his fiat for a writ of error to a defendant convicted of a misdemeanour Held, that in a proper case, the fiat was due ex debito justitia; but that the Attorney General was to determine, on his owri responsibility, whether or not each case was proper ; and that this Court could not review his decision.

Citations:

[1855] EngR 353, (1855) 4 El and Bl 869, (1855) 119 ER 323

Links:

Commonlii

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Cited by:

CitedGouriet v Union of Post Office Workers HL 26-Jul-1977
The claimant sought an injunction to prevent the respondent Trades Union calling on its members to boycott mail to South Africa. The respondents challenged the ability of the court to make such an order.
Held: The wide wording of the statute . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative

Updated: 02 May 2022; Ref: scu.292275

Safeway Food Stores Ltd v Scottish Provident Institution: 1989

Citations:

1989 SLT 131

Jurisdiction:

Scotland

Cited by:

CitedDavidson v Scottish Ministers HL 15-Dec-2005
The complainant a prisoner sought an order that he should not be kept in conditions found to be inhumane. He had been detained in Barlinnie priosn. The Crown replied that a mandatory order was not available against the Scottish Ministers.
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative

Updated: 01 May 2022; Ref: scu.237568

Connor v Strathclyde Regional Council: 1986

Citations:

1986 SLT 530

Jurisdiction:

Scotland

Cited by:

CitedDavidson v Scottish Ministers HL 15-Dec-2005
The complainant a prisoner sought an order that he should not be kept in conditions found to be inhumane. He had been detained in Barlinnie priosn. The Crown replied that a mandatory order was not available against the Scottish Ministers.
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative

Updated: 01 May 2022; Ref: scu.237567

Regina (Conlon) v Secretary of State for the Home Department: 11 Dec 2000

Judges:

Thomas J

Citations:

Unreported, 11 December 2000

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Cited by:

CitedIn re McFarland HL 29-Apr-2004
The claimant was convicted, imprisoned, and then his conviction was overturned. He sought compensation. He had pleaded guilty after being told by counsel to expect an adverse direction from the magistrate, following a meeting in private between . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative

Updated: 29 April 2022; Ref: scu.196537

Regina (Howard and Another) v Secretary of State for Health: QBD 15 Mar 2002

The applicants sought orders that enquiries into the activities of doctors under the Act should be held in public.
Held: The Act contained no presumption that enquiries should be in public, and the Wagstaff case created no general principle to that effect. The right to free expression did not include the right to receive from others information they were unwilling to impart. It was for the Secretary of State to make a decision in each case, and his decisions stood.

Judges:

Justice Scott Baker

Citations:

Times 28-Mar-2002, Gazette 23-May-2002

Statutes:

National Health Service Act 1977 2, European Convention on Human Rights Art 10.1

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Citing:

CitedRegina v Secretary of State for Health, Ex Parte Wagstaff etc QBD 31-Aug-2000
The Secretary of State announced a public enquiry into the Shipman case. He did not say whether it would be a public enquiry. The bereaved families and media wanted it to be public, and contended that it had been invalidly constituted, that an . .
CitedLeander v Sweden ECHR 26-Mar-1987
Mr Leander had been refused employment at a museum located on a naval base, having been assessed as a security risk on the basis of information stored on a register maintained by State security services that had not been disclosed him. Mr Leander . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative, Health Professions, Human Rights

Updated: 28 April 2022; Ref: scu.168067

Regina v Leicester Crown Court ex parte Kaur: Admn 30 Oct 1996

The claimant sought leave to bring judicial review of decision first to estreat her recognisance of andpound;150,000 and second not to deal with her complaint about the behaviour of the Crown Court.
Held: The request for a review was out of time. The decisions followed a finding that the applicant was both unreliable in her evidence and culpable in failing to ensure the attendance of her son for trial. The request was refused.

Judges:

Potts J

Citations:

[1996] EWHC Admin 170

Statutes:

Powers of Criminal Courts Act 1973 31(1)

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Criminal Practice, Administrative

Updated: 28 April 2022; Ref: scu.136718

Adams v Adams: 1971

Despite the lack of modern English authority applying the doctrine, it was still part of the English common law, that the acts of a de facto officer were validated. The de facto officer must have some basis for his assumption of office, variously expressed as ‘colourable title’ or ‘colourable authority’. The President declined to recognise a divorce decree granted in Rhodesia by a Judge who had been appointed under the Constitution adopted in 1965 after the Unilateral Declaration of Independence. The case did not fall within the de facto doctrine ‘even so widely stated’ as in State v Carroll because the circumstances of his appointment which made it invalid in the eyes of English law were very well known, indeed notorious. The President could find no trace of its ever being applied during a rebellion to accord recognition to the judicial or official acts or under a usurping power.

Judges:

Sir Jocelyn Simon P

Citations:

[1971] P 188

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Cited by:

CitedFawdry and Co (A Firm) v Murfitt CA 14-May-2002
The judge at first instance who was ticketed to sit as a judge in the Technology and Construction Court, had been asked to sit as a judge of the High Court to take this case. The appellant said she was acting outside her powers.
Held: The . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative

Updated: 28 April 2022; Ref: scu.180989

Robinson v Commissioners of Customs and Excise: QBD 28 Apr 2000

Customs offered a reward for information, but the offer was clearly not a certainty, and there had been no intention to create a contractual or legal relationship. The informant had been clearly told that the decision as to the award would not be made by the officer, but by his superior in that officer’s discretion, and therefore no legal binding offer to make payment had been made.

Citations:

Times 28-Apr-2000

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Administrative, Contract, Customs and Excise

Updated: 28 April 2022; Ref: scu.88824

Ball v Secretary of Satte for the Environment Transport and the Regions and Another: QBD 27 Jan 2000

The applicant had appealed against an enforcement notice saying that the four year rule applied. The inspector issued his decision after the expiry of a time limit, but after the applicant had requested a further short period in which to make representations. It was held to be unfair to have proceeded without allowing more than a week for representations. B had suffered substantial prejudice for the failure to allow him to make such representations, and the decision was set aside.

Citations:

Gazette 27-Jan-2000

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Planning, Natural Justice, Administrative

Updated: 19 April 2022; Ref: scu.78119

T v United Kingdom (Application 24724/94); V v United Kingdom (Application 24888/94): ECFI 17 Dec 1999

It was a breach of the human rights of a prisoner for a member of the Executive to set his sentencing tariff. That matter had to be decided by a court, or subject to a review by a court. The trial of young children in a very public forum had effectively denied to them any ability to participate in their own defence, and so had also been in breach of their rights to a fair trial. The trial itself of a ten year old was not necessarily inhuman or degrading treatment.

Citations:

Times 17-Dec-1999

Statutes:

European Convention on Human Rights Art 3, 6

Jurisdiction:

European

Criminal Sentencing, Human Rights, Administrative

Updated: 18 April 2022; Ref: scu.89684

EUIPO v European Dynamics Luxembourg and Others: ECJ 3 May 2018

Public Service Contracts – Provision of External Services – Judgment – Appeal – Public service contracts – Provision of external services for programme and project management and technical consultancy in the field of information technologies – Cascade procedure – Article 21 of the Statute of the Court of Justice of the European Union – Article 76 and Article 84(1) of the Rules of Procedure of the General Court -Ruling ultra petita prohibited – Weighting of sub-criteria within award criteria – Manifest errors of assessment – Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 1605/2002 – Article 100(2) – Decision rejecting a tender – Failure to state reasons – Loss of opportunity – Non-contractual liability of the European Union – Claim for damages

Citations:

ECLI:EU:C:2018:299, [2018] EUECJ C-376/16P

Links:

Bailii

Jurisdiction:

European

Administrative

Updated: 14 April 2022; Ref: scu.609508

European Dynamics Luxembourg and Evropaiki Dynamiki v Commission: ECFI 26 Apr 2018

Judgment – Public service contracts – Invitation to tender procedure – Support and advice services for technical and computer personnel IV (STIS IV) – Rejection of a tenderer’s tender – Obligation to state reasons – Offer abnormally lower – Award criteria – Manifest errors of assessment – Non-contractual liability

Citations:

ECLI:EU:T:2018:233, [2018] EUECJ T-752/15

Links:

Bailii

Jurisdiction:

European

Administrative

Updated: 14 April 2022; Ref: scu.609308

Lewin, Regina (on The Application of) v The Financial Reporting Council Ltd and Others: Admn 19 Mar 2018

Judges:

Nicola Davies DBE J

Citations:

[2018] EWHC 446 (Admin), [2018] WLR(D) 183, [2018] 1 WLR 2867

Links:

Bailii, WLRD

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Citing:

Citedin re Pergamon Press Ltd CA 1971
The court was asked as to the duties of inspectors appointed under the 1948 Act. Sachs LJ said: ‘The inspectors’ function is in essence to conduct an investigation designed to discover whether there are facts which may result in others taking . .

Cited by:

Main JudgmentLewin, Regina (on The Application of) v The Financial Reporting Council Ltd and Others (Costs) Admn 19-Mar-2018
. .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Financial Services, Administrative

Updated: 13 April 2022; Ref: scu.608934

Club Hotel Loutraki and Others: ECJ 6 May 2010

Directive 92/50/EEC Public service contracts Service concessions Mixed contract – Contract including the transfer of a block of shares in a public casino business – Contract under which the contracting authority entrusts to the contracting undertaking the management of a casino business and the execution of a development plan consisting in upgrading the casino premises and improving the surrounding area Directive 89/665/EEC – Decision of the contracting authority – Effective and rapid remedies National procedural law – Criteria for the award of damages – Prior annulment of the unlawful act or omission or a finding of its nullity by the competent court Members of a consortium in a public procurement procedure – Decision adopted in the context of that procedure by an authority other than the contracting authority – Action brought, individually, by some members of the consortium – Admissibility

Citations:

[2010] EUECJ C-145/08, [2010] 3 CMLR 33

Links:

Bailii

Jurisdiction:

European

Citing:

OpinionClub Hotel Loutraki and Others ECJ 29-Oct-2009
ECJ (Law Relating To Undertakings) Opinion – Public contracts – Contract for the sale of shares and a service component – Classification Procedure for the award of public contracts – National legislation . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative

Updated: 13 April 2022; Ref: scu.608735

Regina v Secretary of State for the Environment Transport and the Regions, ex parte Rochford District Council: QBD 31 May 2000

A council had failed to fulfil its obligation to update and republish its local plan. The applicant had sought permission to develop a block of flats, but the council failed to determine the application. He appealed to the inspector who also awarded him a contribution to his costs on the basis that there was no proper reason for state of the council’s plan, and because of an error in the application of a policy. On appeal it as held that though the faults pre-dated the application, that was clearly provided for in Circular 8/93

Citations:

Times 31-May-2000

Planning, Administrative

Updated: 10 April 2022; Ref: scu.88625

Regina v Secretary of State for Trade and Industry ex parte Orange Personal Communications Ltd and Another: Admn 25 Oct 2000

Once rights by way of licences had been granted to a party by virtue of a statute, an amendment to those licences required the Secretary to be explicit with Parliament when altering the licences. The Act provided clear rules for making amendments to licences. The Secretary purported to amend the licences to comply with a European Directive, but the new regulations did not specifically disapply the regime for amending the licences. He should have made it clear in the statutory instrument that the protections were being removed. The regulations made under section 2(2) of the 1972 Act which, if valid, took away valuable rights of Orange which they had enjoyed under the Telecommunications Act 1984, were ultra vires, on the ground that the regulations had failed explicitly to state that rights enjoyed under primary legislation were being taken away.

Citations:

Times 15-Nov-2000, Gazette 23-Nov-2000

Statutes:

Telecommunications Act 1984 12 13 14 15, Telecommunications (Licence Modification) (Standard Schedules) Regulations 1999 (1999 no 2540), European Communities Act 1972 2(2)

Citing:

DistinguishedRegina v Secretary of State for Trade and Industry ex parte Unison 1996
The 1978 Directive required consultation in the case of collective redundancies. Acts had incorrectly incorporated this requirement into English law. The error was corrected in the 1995 Regulations.
Held: Anything is ‘related to’ a Community . .

Cited by:

CitedOakley Inc v Animal Ltd and others PatC 17-Feb-2005
A design for sunglasses was challenged for prior publication. However the law in England differed from that apparently imposed from Europe as to the existence of a 12 month period of grace before applying for registration.
Held: Instruments . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative, Media, Licensing, Constitutional

Updated: 10 April 2022; Ref: scu.88661

Regina v Secretary of the Central Office of the Employment Tribunals (England and Wales), ex parte Public Concern at Work: QBD 9 May 2000

The Central Office of Tribunals must record the particulars of Employment Tribunal decisions. It has in the past recorded the existence of the application but no details. The court held that the register must include details of the parties, the particulars of the allegations made, and the full text of the decision where recorded. The word ‘particulars’ has a clear meaning to lawyers which would include such details, and other provisions presumed that such details were provided.

Citations:

Times 09-May-2000

Statutes:

Employment Tribunals (Constitution and Rules of Procedure) Regulations 1996 1757

Employment, Administrative

Updated: 10 April 2022; Ref: scu.88664

Regina v Governor of Dartmoor Prison, Ex Parte N: QBD 20 Mar 2001

The applicant was convicted of a sexual assault, sentenced and released. His conviction became spent under the Act. He later was convicted of other offences and sentenced again, but on release the details of the spent conviction were relayed by the Governor to the local social services under guidance issued by the Home Office. Though there was an apparent conflict between the guidance and the Act, the guidance required only disclosure in the course of an official duty and was lawful.

Citations:

Times 20-Mar-2001

Statutes:

Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974

Administrative

Updated: 10 April 2022; Ref: scu.88479

Regina v Environmental Agency, ex parte Marchiori and Another: QBD 12 Apr 2001

The Agency had granted licences for the disposal of nuclear waste from military sites by a private company. Such disposals were not governed by the Euratom Treaty, which dealt with civil wastes only. The matter was generated in the course of the Trident nuclear weapons programme, the legality of which under international law, which the Environment Agency had properly considered to be outwith its jurisdiction. The later confirmation by the Food Standards Agency of the licence remedied the defect as regards the need for its approval at the time.

Citations:

Gazette 12-Apr-2001

Statutes:

Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (Nov 1990), Environment Act 1995 16(4A)(b)

European, Environment, Administrative

Updated: 10 April 2022; Ref: scu.88445

Regina v Secretary of State for the Home Department ex parte Mehmet; Regina v Same, ex parte O’Connor: QBD 18 Feb 1999

A prisoner’s allocation to a close supervision unit did not require him to be given opportunity to make representations before the move. It was not intended to be punitive, did not delay his release, nor result in worse prison conditions.

Citations:

Times 18-Feb-1999

Administrative

Updated: 10 April 2022; Ref: scu.87880

Regina v Secretary of State for the Environment and Another Ex Parte Kirkstall Valley Campaign Ltd: QBD 20 Mar 1996

The rules as to the disqualification of a decision maker for bias were not limited in scope to judicial decisions.

Citations:

Times 20-Mar-1996

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Cited by:

CitedRegina (Loudon) v Bury School Organisation Committee Admn 2002
Lightman J said: ‘The distinction between (disqualifying) pecuniary interests and (non-disqualifying) potential pre-judgment arising from prior publicly stated views in the case of administrative bodies . . is well-established: see e.g. R v SSE ex p . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative

Updated: 10 April 2022; Ref: scu.87781

Regina v Secretary of State for Education and Employment, Ex Parte Amraf Training Plc: QBD 17 Oct 2000

Although the department had registered a course for an eighty per cent subsidy for trainees, in the absence of knowledge of what fees would be charged, it remained open to the department later to withdraw that recognition when the amounts payable appeared not to represent value for money, and even though students had been accepted onto the course. The existing students had been allowed to complete the course, and the provider offered the opportunity to apply to re-register at a lower course fee, but had refused. Value for money was a relevant factor.

Citations:

Times 17-Oct-2000

Education, Administrative

Updated: 10 April 2022; Ref: scu.87704

Regina v Secretary of State for Home Department Ex Parte Hickey and Others, Same Ex Parte Bamber; Same Ex Parte Malone (No 2): QBD 29 Nov 1994

The Home Secretary is obliged to disclose new evidence to a defendant before rejecting his application for a reference to Court of Appeal. The Home Secretary’s powers to refer a case back to the Court of Appeal (Criminal Division) was an integral part of the just functioning of the overall process of criminal justice. A decision maker may treat submissions about the decision differently if they are only allowed after it has been made when ‘it is difficult to suppose that [a decision maker] can remain as open-minded as if no clear decision has been taken’ and ‘The guiding principle should always be that sufficient disclosure should be given to enable the petitioner properly to present his best case.’

Judges:

Simon Brown LJ

Citations:

Independent 29-Nov-1994, Times 02-Dec-1994, [1995] 1 WLR 734

Statutes:

Criminal Appeal Act 1968 17

Citing:

ApprovedRegina v Parole Board and Another ex parte Wilson CA 6-May-1992
It was natural justice to allow a discretionary lifer to see the reports which had been prepared for consideration on his application for release on licence. W had been sentenced to life imprisonment for buggery, and was a discretionary life . .

Cited by:

CitedSecretary of State for the Home Department v SP CA 21-Dec-2004
The applcant, a girl aged 17 was in a young offender institution. She complained that she had been removed to segregation without first giving her chance to be heard. The respondent argued that there were sufficient post decision safeguards to . .
CitedRoberts v Parole Board HL 7-Jul-2005
Balancing Rights of Prisoner and Society
The appellant had been convicted of the murder of three police officers in 1966. His tariff of thirty years had now long expired. He complained that material put before the Parole Board reviewing has case had not been disclosed to him.
Held: . .
See AlsoRegina v Secretary of State for the Home Department, Ex Parte Bamber CA 15-Feb-1996
The right of a prisoner to provide a recorded message for a radio station could properly be curtailed. . .
See AlsoBamber v United Kingdom ECHR 11-Sep-1997
The Commission declared inadmissible a complaint that Standing Order 5 G 2B infringed Article 10. The Order precluded prisoners from contacting the media by telephone except in exceptional circumstances. The Standing Order satisfied the requirement . .
See AlsoRegina v Secretary of State for Home Department (ex parte Bamber) Admn 24-Apr-1998
The applicant was refused leave to apply for judicial review of a decision as to his release made on the basis of his refusal to accept his guilt. . .
See AlsoBamber v Regina CACD 12-Dec-2002
. .
See AlsoBamber, Regina v CACD 14-May-2009
The defendant had been convicted in 1986 of the murder of five members of his adoptive family. The judge had initially recommended a minimum term of 25 years. A later judge had suggested a whole life term. The convictions had been upheld in 2002. . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Criminal Practice, Administrative, Prisons

Updated: 10 April 2022; Ref: scu.87750

Regina v Registrar General for England and Wales Ex Parte P; Same v Same Ex Parte G: QBD 27 Mar 1996

Sexual identity is fixed at birth. It is not an error capable of being corrected by the Registrar. The Registrar has no power to alter birth register to change the sex as registered after gender re-assignment surgery.

Citations:

Times 27-Mar-1996, Independent 22-Feb-1996

Statutes:

Births and Deaths Registration Act 1953 1(1) 29(3)

Administrative, Discrimination

Updated: 10 April 2022; Ref: scu.87619

Regina v Liverpool City Council Ex Parte Muldoon; Regina v Same Ex Parte Kelly: HL 11 Jul 1996

The claimant sought to challenge a refusal of the Housing Authority to pay housing benefit. The Secretary of State had made the relevant Regulations determining eligibility for benefits. If the challenge were successful, the Secretary of State would be affected financially by reason of his obligation to pay sums to the Authority.
Held: The Secretary of State is not to be made party to judicial review proceedings even though he would be the ultimate payer. Though a party directly affected by the claim may be joined as an interested party, Lord Keith said: ‘That a person is directly affected by something connotes that he is affected without the intervention of any intermediate agency. In the present case, if the applications for judicial review are successful the Secretary of State will not have to pay housing benefit to the applicants either directly or through the agency of the local authority. What will happen is that up to 95% will be added to the subsidy paid by the Secretary of State to the local authority after the end of the financial year. The Secretary of State would certainly be affected by the decision, and it may be said that he would inevitably or necessarily be affected. But he would in my opinion, be only indirectly affected by reason of his collateral obligation to pay subsidy to the local authority.’ The Secretary of State has no locus to insist on joining in on such judicial review proceedings despite being the eventual payer of the benefit payment decision being reviewed.
The Secretary of State has no locus to insist on joining in on judicial review proceedings despite being the eventual payer of the benefit payment decision being reviewed.

Judges:

Lord Keith

Citations:

Times 11-Jul-1996, Gazette 12-Sep-1996, [1996] 1 WLR 1103

Statutes:

Rules of the Supreme Court O 53 r593)

Citing:

Appeal fromRegina v Liverpool City Council Ex Parte Muldoon; Regina v Rent Officer Service and Another Ex Parte Kelly CA 18-Apr-1995
The Secretary of State was not entitled to be served with notice of all Judicial Review applications on benefits. He was not sufficiently directy connected, . .

Cited by:

CitedAXA General Insurance Ltd and Others v Lord Advocate and Others SCS 8-Jan-2010
The claimant sought to challenge the validity of the 2009 Act by judicial review. The Act would make their insured and themselves liable to very substantial unanticipated claims for damages for pleural plaques which would not previousl or otherwise . .
CitedNemeti and Others v Sabre Insurance Co Ltd CA 3-Dec-2013
The court considered the power of courts to allow substitution of a new party after the expiration of the limitation period. . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Benefits, Administrative, Litigation Practice, Judicial Review

Updated: 09 April 2022; Ref: scu.87193

Regina v Harrow London Borough Council Ex Parte Carter: QBD 25 Nov 1992

The applicant had sold her home and moved to Harrow with her four children, living with her sister. She became unintentionally homess and had priority need, applying to Harrow for accomodation. Harrow said that under their policy she retained her local connection with Camden, and refused assistance beyond referring her to Camden.
Held: The applicant had a possible case for special assistance under section 61 so as to establish a local connection with Harrow. The discretion given to local authorities under section 67(1) could not be disclaimed under a strict policy. They had to consider each individual case, and the policy had to allow exceptions.
Mr Roger Henderson QC said ‘I have seen no evidence of a decision focusing upon the respondents’ discretion under section 67 of the Act whether or not in all the circumstances of Mrs Carter’s case to refer her to Brent. Instead, although for reasons to which I will come I am sure that the respondents’ senior officers in the housing department and its members were well aware that such a reference was discretionary and not mandatory, there is persuasive evidence that the reference to Brent was made as an automatic and unreviewed consequence of the decision that Mrs. Carter had no local connection and had not established special circumstances. I refer to this because although the reference to Brent led to nothing and it not the subject of judicial review, yet it is a significant feature in the history of this case which points to a similar unlawful approach in the decision-making when the reference to the London Borough of Camden occurred a month later.’

Judges:

Mr Roger Henderson QC

Citations:

Gazette 25-Nov-1992, (1992) 26 HLR 32

Statutes:

Housing Act 1985 61 67(1)

Cited by:

CitedRegina v East Devon District Council ex parte Robb Admn 4-Dec-1997
. .
CitedRegina v London Borough of Ealing ex parte Anthony Fox Admn 9-Feb-1998
. .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Housing, Administrative

Updated: 09 April 2022; Ref: scu.86817

Regina v Devon County Council Ex Parte Baker, Regina v Durham County Council Ex Parte Broxson: CA 22 Feb 1993

A Local Authority considering closing a residential home did not have a duty to notify and consult with each resident who might be affected, but did have a duty to act fairly, and to give sufficiently prominent notice and sufficient time to allow residents to make representations and give their objections, and for these to be considered. Considering legitimate expectations: ‘Sometimes the phrase is used to denote a substantive right: an entitlement that the claimant asserts cannot be denied him . . various authorities show that the claimants right will only be found established when there is a clear and unambiguous representation upon which it was reasonable for him to rely. Then the administrator or other public body will be held bound in fairness by the representation made unless only its promise or undertaking as to how its power would be exercised is inconsistent with the statutory duties imposed upon it. The doctrine employed in this sense is akin to an estoppel. In so far as the public body’s representation is communicated by way of a stated policy, this type of legitimate expectation falls into two distinct sub categories: cases in which the authority are held entitled to change their policy even so as to effect the claimant, and those in which they are not.’

Judges:

Simon Brown LJ

Citations:

Ind Summary 22-Feb-1993, [1995] 1 All ER 73

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Cited by:

ApprovedCowl and others v Plymouth City Council Admn 14-Sep-2001
The applicants were residents of a nursing home run by the respondents, and sought judicial review of the decision to close it. Before making the decision, the council consulted the residents and concluded that none had been offered a ‘home for . .
CitedRegina v Department of Education and Employment ex parte Begbie CA 20-Aug-1999
A statement made by a politician as to his intentions on a particular matter if elected could not create a legitimate expectation as regards the delivery of the promise after elected, even where the promise would directly affect individuals, and the . .
CitedRegina on Application of Dinev and Others v Westminster City Council Admn 24-Oct-2000
Street artists had operated in Leicester Square for many years without either licenses or being prosecuted. The respondent introduced a scheme to regulate them, and the applicants sought to challenge it by way of judicial review, alleging a failure . .
AppliedRegina v London Borough of Islington ex parte East Admn 1996
The court considered the obligation on an authority to consult: ‘.. the precise demands of consultation .. there according to the circumstances .. The extent and method of consultation must depend on the circumstances. Underlying what is required . .
CitedWatch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Britain v Charity Commission Admn 12-Dec-2014
The respondent had instigated a statutory inquiry under the 2011 Act into the claimant’s child safeguarding practices, and policies after compaints made to it. The Society now sought judicial review of that decision, and to production orders made to . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Local Government, Administrative

Updated: 09 April 2022; Ref: scu.86536

Regina (Marchiori and Another) v Environmental Agency: QBD 1 May 2001

The Agency had granted licences for the disposal of nuclear waste from military sites by a private company. Such disposals were not governed by the Euratom Treaty, which dealt with civil wastes only. The matter was generated in the course of the Trident nuclear weapons programme, the legality of which under international law, which the Environment Agency had properly considered to be outwith its jurisdiction. The later confirmation by the Food Standards Agency of the licence remedied the defect as regards the need for its approval at the time.

Citations:

Times 01-May-2001

Statutes:

Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (Nov 1990), Environment Act 1995 16(4A)(b)

European, Environment, Administrative

Updated: 09 April 2022; Ref: scu.85985

Regina (On the Application of Hughes and Others) v Commissioner for Local Administration: QBD 17 May 2001

The local authority had granted planning permission for a development, but failed to secure either an advance payment for the making up of the estate roads, to secure a bond and agreement, or to make an order exempting the estate form this requirement. The developer failed without the road being made up, and the residents complained of maladministration. The Commissioner found that there had been no maladministration. On the appeal, the Commissioner accepted the report was defective.
Held: If the matter was to be referred back to the Commissioner, it was wrong to fetter the Commissioners discretion by giving particular directions as to the findings to be made.

Citations:

Gazette 17-May-2001

Statutes:

Highways Act 1980 219(1), 220

Local Government, Administrative

Updated: 09 April 2022; Ref: scu.85991

Regina (P) v Secretary of State for the Home Department, Regina (Q) v Same: QBD 1 Jun 2001

The Prison Service’s policy of refusing to allow children over the age of eighteen months to stay with their mother in prison was lawful. The impairment of family life was an inevitable and inherent part of the imposition of a sentence of imprisonment. The policy was to designed allow for the protection of children’s interests so far as possible. The use of a fixed age allowed proper preparation, and consistency of facilities, and there was nothing in the policy to prevent consideration of the individual circumstances in particular cases. There were arguments both for lowering the age so as to minimise the damage by occasioning it when the bond between mother and child was less, and otherwise.

Citations:

Times 01-Jun-2001, Gazette 21-Jun-2001, [2001] 3 FCR 416, [2001] FLR 1122

Statutes:

Prison Rules 1999 (1999 No 728), Children Act 1989 1, Prison Act 1952

Cited by:

CitedC and Another v Bury Metropolitan Borough Council FD 18-Jul-2002
Where a children case involving a challenge to a care plan or the placement of children in care would raise issues under the Human Rights legislation, the case should normally be heard before a High Court judge of the Family Division. If possible it . .
CitedC and Another v Bury Metropolitan Borough Council FD 18-Jul-2002
Where a children case involving a challenge to a care plan or the placement of children in care would raise issues under the Human Rights legislation, the case should normally be heard before a High Court judge of the Family Division. If possible it . .
CitedEvans v Amicus Healthcare Ltd and others CA 25-Jun-2004
The applicant challenged the decision of the court that the sperm donor who had fertilised her eggs to create embryos stored by the respondent IVF clinic, could withdraw his consent to their continued storage or use.
Held: The judge worked . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative, Human Rights, Criminal Sentencing

Updated: 09 April 2022; Ref: scu.85996

Regina v Westminster City Council, Ex Parte Union of Managerial and Professional Officers and Others: QBD 13 Jun 2000

It was not an abuse of power by a local authority who had been asked to pay the costs of its officers and members successfully defending themselves against an action by the district auditor for malpractice, first to verify that it had any legal duty or power to provide such an indemnity. However such an indemnity would be good administrative policy. As a policy the authority retained the discretion as to the terms of its implementation.

Citations:

Times 13-Jun-2000

Local Government, Administrative

Updated: 09 April 2022; Ref: scu.85607

Regina v Secretary of State for the Environment Transport and the Regions, Ex Parte Wheeler: QBD 29 Jun 2000

The minister decided that upon land which had been compulsorily purchased, but which was no longer needed being sold, it should not first be offered back to the original owners. The owner complained that the decision was in breach of the rules, which required such an offer unless it was a very exceptional case with strong and urgent reasons of public interest. They argued that this required a risk to life or limb. This was too close a definition. For such a decision to be intrinsically perverse, it had to defy comprehension. In this case, the secretary had asked himself the right questions, and the challenge failed.

Citations:

Gazette 29-Jun-2000, Gazette 20-Jul-2000, Times 04-Aug-2000

Statutes:

Crichel Down Rules 1992

Land, Administrative

Updated: 09 April 2022; Ref: scu.85497

Regina v Secretary of State for the Home Department Ex Parte Quaquah: QBD 20 Jan 2000

An asylum seeker had been wrongly accused of riot and sought to sue for damages for malicious prosecution. The Home Secretary, a possible defendant in that action decided to expel the failed asylum seeker.
Held: Such an action was in breach of the principle of equality of arms enshrined in the treaty, and deprived the applicant of any opportunity to prepare and present his case. The Secretary should have considered these elements before ordering the deportation.

Citations:

Gazette 20-Jan-2000, Times 21-Jan-2000

Statutes:

Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms 1953 (1953 Cmd 8969), Civil Procedure Rules Rule 1.1(2)(a)

Cited by:

See AlsoQuaquah v Group 4 Securities Ltd and Another QBD 27-Jun-2001
The claimant had been detained in an immigration detention centre. He complained of a malicious prosecution by the company, and against the secretary of state, in exercising a non-delegable duty to provide for his safety whilst in custody.
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative, Immigration

Updated: 09 April 2022; Ref: scu.85525

Regina v Secretary of State for the Home Department, Ex Parte Al-Fayed: QBD 16 Nov 1999

When considering whether the Human Rights of a citizen had been infringed, the doctrine of proportionality was not to be extended to extend in turn such rights. At present the doctrine is part of European law, but not part of domestic English administrative law, and could not be called in aid to support an application for nationality.

Citations:

Times 16-Nov-1999

Statutes:

British Nationality Act 1981 Sch 1 (1) (b)

Human Rights, European, Administrative

Updated: 09 April 2022; Ref: scu.85528

Regina v Secretary of State for the Home Department, Ex Parte Ullah: QBD 17 Oct 2000

The fact that a claimant had acquired British citizenship in one way did not take away his right in addition to apply for naturalisation arising from his rights by descent. The latter process would create additional rights for his own children, and he had the right to apply. There was nothing in the legislation to suggest that the two alternatives were mutually exclusive, and the Home Office’s practice to the contrary was unlawful.

Citations:

Times 17-Oct-2000

Statutes:

British Nationality Act 1981 6

Immigration, Administrative

Updated: 09 April 2022; Ref: scu.85541

Regina v Secretary of State for Education and Employment, Ex Parte National Union of Teachers: QBD 8 Aug 2000

The general power of the Secretary of State to promote education did not extend to provision for the terms and conditions of teachers’ employment or establishing systems for the payment of higher rates of pay to teachers meeting performance standards. Reference to Parliament was necessary. The Secretary of State had not followed consultation procedures set down for the making of significant alterations to teachers contracts.

Citations:

Times 08-Aug-2000

Statutes:

School Teachers’ Pay and Conditions Act 1991

Education, Employment, Administrative

Updated: 09 April 2022; Ref: scu.85477

Regina v Director General of Electricity Supply, Ex Parte London Electricity Plc: QBD 13 Jun 2000

Where the cost of upgrading supply systems in order to support large numbers of newly installed night storage systems fell to be apportioned, the test as to who should bear the burden was according to causation. An increase under twenty five per cent would not have occasioned a charge, and individually no one supply exceeded that amount, but the Director must look to the whole scheme. For one identifiable scheme it was unrealistic to break it back down into individual increments in demand.

Citations:

Times 13-Jun-2000

Administrative, Judicial Review

Updated: 09 April 2022; Ref: scu.85226

Regina v Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority, Ex Parte Leatherland; similar: QBD 12 Oct 2000

The practice of withholding the reasons for a decision until the day of an appeal which had come to be adopted was unfair and bad administration. The Tribunal should give proper reasons for its decision, together with the gist of any evidence which they had taken into account in coming to that decision. Such a system had caused unnecessary expense, and caused litigation rather than prevented it.

Citations:

Times 12-Oct-2000, [2001] ACD 76

Cited by:

CitedRegina on Application of M v Criminal Injuries Compensation Appeals Panel Admn 31-Aug-2001
The complainant had suffered repeated acts of sexual abuse as a child including acts of penetration. She sought compensation under the scheme, but was initially refused on the basis that it was not a crime of violence, then later awarded pounds . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Natural Justice, Personal Injury, Administrative

Updated: 09 April 2022; Ref: scu.85208

Quaquah v Group 4 Securities Ltd and Another: QBD 27 Jun 2001

The claimant had been detained in an immigration detention centre. He complained of a malicious prosecution by the company, and against the secretary of state, in exercising a non-delegable duty to provide for his safety whilst in custody.
Held: The Secretary of State had used all reasonable care in the selection of the sub-contractor, and was not liable for the wrongful acts of that company’s servants or agents. The duty was delegable.

Citations:

Times 27-Jun-2001

Citing:

See AlsoRegina v Secretary of State for the Home Department Ex Parte Quaquah QBD 20-Jan-2000
An asylum seeker had been wrongly accused of riot and sought to sue for damages for malicious prosecution. The Home Secretary, a possible defendant in that action decided to expel the failed asylum seeker.
Held: Such an action was in breach of . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Torts – Other, Administrative

Updated: 09 April 2022; Ref: scu.85092

Practice Direction (Administrative Court Establishment): QBD 27 Jul 2000

The direction establishes the Administrative Court as a successor to the Crown Office List. Existing orders and directions applying to the List should be renamed. A lead nominated judge would take responsibility for the speed efficiency and economy of the conduct of the court’s business. New rules for judicial review will also be implemented to accompany the introduction of the Human Rights Act.

Citations:

Times 27-Jul-2000

Administrative, Litigation Practice

Updated: 09 April 2022; Ref: scu.84842

Percy and Another v Hall and Others: QBD 31 May 1996

There was no wrongful arrest where the bylaw under which it was made was invalid. The question is the belief of the arresting officers. The effect of retrospective legislation is not always fully worked through. English law provides no cause of action for invalid administrative acts as such. A ‘second actor’ may be blameless if he detains a person in reliance on what appears to be a lawful authority, whether issued by a ‘first actor’ or otherwise.
Simon Brown LJ said of a byelaw under consideration: ‘Better . . to treat the instrument as valid unless so uncertain in its language as to have no ascertainable meaning, or so unclear in its effect as to be incapable of certain application in any case.’

Judges:

Simon Brown LJ, Schliemann LJ

Citations:

Times 31-May-1996, [1997] QB 924

Cited by:

CitedInter Lotto (Uk) Ltd v Camelot Group Plc CA 30-Jul-2003
The claimant and defendant had each operated using a the name ‘HotSpot’ for a name for its lottery. The respondent had registered the name as a trade mark. The claimant began to use the name first and claimed in passing off, and the respondent . .
CitedBoddington v British Transport Police HL 2-Apr-1998
The defendant had been convicted, under regulations made under the Act, of smoking in a railway carriage. He sought to challenge the validity of the regulations themselves. He wanted to argue that the power to ban smoking on carriages did not . .
CitedID and others v The Home Office (BAIL for Immigration Detainees intervening) CA 27-Jan-2005
The claimants sought damages and other reliefs after being wrongfully detained by immigration officers for several days, during which they had been detained at a detention centre and left locked up when it burned down, being released only by other . .
CitedTabernacle v Secretary of State for Defence Admn 6-Mar-2008
The court considered the validity of bye-laws used to exclude protesters from land near a military base at Aldermarston.
Held: The byelaw which banned an ‘camp’ was sufficiently certain, but not that part which sought to ban any person who . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Torts – Other, Police, Administrative

Updated: 09 April 2022; Ref: scu.84667

Mayne and Another v Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food: QBD 3 Aug 2000

The defendants exported beef without the requisite certificates. The UK rules had been made before a Directive came into effect. On appeal after conviction the defendant argued that the rules purported to take account of future amendments. It was held that for a criminal sanction to be applicable, Regulations could not give effect to directives made by a third party without appropriate and explicit incorporation of those amendments. A regulation imposing sanctions for failure to comply with an EC Directive is not to be read as applying to future amendments to the Directive unless the wording of the regulations is such as clearly to take account of the possibility of future amendments.

Judges:

Kennedy LJ and Jackson

Citations:

Times 12-Oct-2000, Gazette 03-Aug-2000, [2001] EHLR 5

Cited by:

AppliedSecretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs v ASDA Stores Ltd and Another QBD 24-Jun-2002
The defendant store had been accused of failing to comply with standards for grading of agricultural produce. They had been acquitted, following Mayne, on the basis that the prosecution was under European regulations introduced after the Act . .
CitedDepartment for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs v ASDA Stores Limited and another HL 18-Dec-2003
The company was prosecuted for offences under the Regulations, relating to the designation of horticultural produce for sale. The original Act had been relied upon to implement the European regulations after entry to the EU.
Held: The offences . .
Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Administrative, Crime, European, Agriculture

Updated: 09 April 2022; Ref: scu.83488

Kuijer v Council of the European Union Case T-188/98: ECJ 14 Apr 2000

An applicant sought access to documents of the Council of the European Union relating to asylum. The decision of the Council to refuse access to the documents was on the grounds that the material was politically sensitive, and disclosure would be against the public interest. The council failed however to consider the status of the separate documents separately, and so the decision was invalid. The default position was that Council documents should be made available, and the ability to withhold related to individual documents.

Citations:

Times 14-Apr-2000

Statutes:

Council Decision 93/731/EC on Public Access to Council documents

European, Immigration, Administrative

Updated: 09 April 2022; Ref: scu.82854

Tt’s Corporation Law Ltd v Commission of the European Communities Case: ECJ 18 Oct 2000

The Community’s general policy of openness must override a Community regulation which imposed severe secrecy restrictions. A regulation was used as a basis to refuse to give to a litigant in England information about relevant mission reports of the EU concerning trade. The general principle was set down with certain exceptions, and could not be set aside for this purpose. In any event the regulation under which access had been refused did not apply to this situation.

Citations:

Times 18-Oct-2000, T-123/99

European, Administrative

Updated: 09 April 2022; Ref: scu.82642

Jefferies and Others v Mayes and Others; National Grid Company Plc v Same; National Power Plc v Feldon and Others: ChD 30 Jun 1997

A lawful decision by pension trustees as to the use of a pension surplus is not susceptible to being overruled by the Pension’s Ombudsman.

Citations:

Times 30-Jun-1997

Jurisdiction:

England and Wales

Financial Services, Administrative, Employment

Updated: 08 April 2022; Ref: scu.82505

In Re A Subpoena Issued by the Commissioner for Local Administration: QBD 2 Apr 1996

Local ombudsman can investigate adoptions and to get confidential papers. His task was not that of a party to litigation, and he may well require more papers than a party to litigation might be entitled to. Even so, and though the sup poena ad duces tecum was confirmed, the Commissioner was invited to reconsider and reduce the scope of the papers requested.

Judges:

Justice Carnwath

Citations:

Times 04-Apr-1996

Administrative, Local Government

Updated: 08 April 2022; Ref: scu.81683