The King v The Mayor, Aldermen, And Burgesses Of The City And Borough Of Oxford: 28 Jan 1837

If a councillor of a corporation be ousted, and another elected in his stead, and such election be merely colourable, a mandamus will go to permit the ousted party to exercise his office, but not to restore him to his office. If such ouster and election be bona fide, the Court will not grant a mandamus in favour of the party displaced :
the proper Proceeding is by quo warrarnto against the party holding the office de facto. Quaere, whether, if a party be elected a councillor, and duly qualified at the time of his election, and his name be afterwards improperly omitted in the burgess-list before his time of service as a councillor is expired, such omission vacate the office of councillor. If so, quaere, whether the office be absolutely vacant before notice to that effect be given, under sect. 52 of stat, 5 and 6 W. 4, c. 76.

[1837] EngR 453, (1837) 6 Ad and E 349, (1837) 112 ER 133
Commonlii
England and Wales

Local Government, Elections

Updated: 26 January 2022; Ref: scu.313570

Rex v The Church Trustees of St Pancras: 26 Jan 1837

Trustees appointed under a local Act for building a new parish church, with power to make rates for that purpose and for discharging debts to be incurred under the Act, are liable to account before parochial auditors appointed under the Vestry Act, 1 and, 2 W. 4, c. 60, as a board having control over part of the parochial expenditure; though the local Act requires such trustees to keep an account of the assessments, receipts and payments under the Act, to be examined and allowed once a year at Quarter Sessions ; and though, by the same Act, their accounts are open to inspection (on payment of 1s.) by any person liable to the above rates. A mandamus calling on such trustees to produce before the auditors ‘the accounts’ (without limit as to time) kept by them under the local Act, and requiririg the clerk to the trustees to produce the books of account which may concern the above accounts, is bad, as exceeding the authority given by stat. 1 and, 2 W. 4, c. 60, ss. 34, 35, although such mandamus begin by reciting a demand made by the auditors upon the trustees in terms conformable to the Act, and a refusal to comply with such demand. When the validity of a return to a mandamus is argued on a concilium, the party impugning the return must begin, although the opposite party states that he shall object to the form of the mandamus.

[1837] EngR 445, (1837) 6 Ad and E 314, (1837) 112 ER 119
Commonlii
England and Wales

Local Government

Updated: 26 January 2022; Ref: scu.313562

In Re Z (Local Authority: Duty): FD 3 Dec 2004

Mrs Z suffered a terminal disease, and sought to travel to Switzerland supported and assisted by her husband, so that she could terminate her life. She appealed an injunction obtained by the authority to prevent her leaving.
Held: The authority had been supporting her. When circumstances came to their attention suggesting she had made a decision seriously against her interests, it was proper for them to investigate, and if appropriate report their concerns to the police. Though she was a vulnerable adult under the statutes, Mrs Z had full capacity, and it was not for them to intervene in this way. Mr Z might be putting himself at risk of a prosecution uunder the 1961 Act. The power to seek an injunction to prevent criminal activity did vest in a local authority, but the jurisdiction should be exercised only with the greatest caution. The authority had had no duty to apply for an injunction, and it was discharged.

Hedley J
[2004] EWHC 2817 (Fam), Times 09-Dec-2004, [2005] 3 All ER 280, [2005] 1 WLR 959, [2005] 1 FLR 740, [2005] 2 FCR 256, (2005) 84 BMLR 160, (2005) 8 CCL Rep 146
Bailii
National Assistance Act 1948 29, National Health Service Act 1977, National Health and Community Care Act 1990, Suicide Act 1961 291), Local Government Act 1972 8222
England and Wales
Citing:
CitedRegina (Burke) v General Medical Council Admn 30-Jul-2004
The applicant, suffering a life threatening disease, wanted to ensure his continued treatment and revival in the circumstance of losing his own capacity. He said the respondent’s guidelines for doctors were discriminatory and failed to protect his . .
CitedIn re B (Consent to treatment: Capacity) FD 22-Mar-2002
The claimant had suffered catastrophic injuries, leaving her unable to breathe without artificial help. She eventually decided that she wanted to refuse treatment. The health authority took this as an indication of lack of capacity, and refused to . .
CitedAiredale NHS Trust v Bland HL 4-Feb-1993
Procedures on Withdrawal of Life Support Treatment
The patient had been severely injured in the Hillsborough disaster, and had come to be in a persistent vegetative state (PVS). The doctors sought permission to withdraw medical treatment. The Official Solicitor appealed against an order of the Court . .
CitedGouriet v Union of Post Office Workers HL 26-Jul-1977
The claimant sought an injunction to prevent the respondent Trades Union calling on its members to boycott mail to South Africa. The respondents challenged the ability of the court to make such an order.
Held: The wide wording of the statute . .

Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Local Government, Health

Updated: 26 January 2022; Ref: scu.221442

Tecnoedi Costruzioni Srl v Comune di Fossano: ECJ 6 Oct 2016

ECJ (Judgment) Reference for a preliminary ruling – Public works contracts – Directive 2004/18/EC – Article 7(c) – Threshold amount for public contracts – Threshold not reached – Abnormally low tenders – Automatic exclusion – Discretion of the contracting authority – Obligations of the contracting authority arising from freedom of establishment, freedom to provide services and the general principle of non-discrimination – Contracts which may be of certain cross-border interest

ECLI:EU:C:2016:747, [2016] EUECJ C-318/15
Bailii
Directive 2004/18/EC
European

Local Government

Updated: 24 January 2022; Ref: scu.570149

Anderson (Inspector of Maybole Parish) v Paterson (Inspector of Irvine Parish): SCS 12 Jun 1878

A pauper child received parochial relief from the parish in which she was living at the time. Her father was an able-bodied man in another parish, but at the time when relief was first given he had no settlement in Scotland. After the father had acquired a residential settlement in that other parish, the inspector of poor in the parish which was affording relief gave the usual statutory notice of chargeability and a claim of relief to the inspector of poor in the parish of the father’s settlement, and intimated that the father, who still continued able-bodied, refused to maintain the child. In these circumstances the Court held that the parish where the father had a settlement, being the parish of settlement of the pauper at the date of the statutory notice, was liable to relieve the parish which had afforded relief of advances made after the date of the statutory notice.

[1878] SLR 15 – 620
Bailii
Scotland

Local Government, Benefits

Updated: 24 January 2022; Ref: scu.577386

Strickland v Hayes: CA 12 Feb 1896

A by-law made by a county council under s 16 of the 1888 Act, was in the following terms: ‘No person shall in any street or public place, or on land adjacent thereto, sing or recite any profane or obscene song or ballad, or use any profane or obscene language’
Held: that the by-law was invalid, since even if the words ‘or on land adjacent thereto,’ which were clearly too wide, were struck out, it was still unreasonable, because it did not contain any words importing that the acts must be done so as to cause annoyance.

Lindley LJ discussed the validity of a byelaw where part appeared invalid: ‘I have no doubt whatever that those words are bad. But that being so, is the rest of the byelaw bad? There is plenty of authority for saying that if a byelaw can be divided, one part may be rejected as bad while the rest may be held to be good. In the present case there is, I think, no difficulty whatever in severing the byelaw. If the words ‘on any land adjacent thereto’ are omitted, the rest of the byelaw reads quite grammatically. The byelaw is, therefore, distinctly severable.’

Lindley LJ
[1896] 1 QB 290, [1896] UKLawRpKQB 380
Commonlii
Local Government Act 1888 16
England and Wales
Cited by:
CitedDirector of Public Prosecutions v Hutchinson; Director of Public Prosecutions v Smith HL 12-Jul-1990
Protesters objected that byelaws which had been made to prevent access to common land, namely Greenham Common were invalid.
Held: The byelaws did prejudice the rights of common. The House was concerned to clarify the test applicable when . .

Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Local Government

Updated: 22 January 2022; Ref: scu.259757

Hornsey Local Board v Monarch Investment Building Society: CA 1889

The local authority had incurred expense in paving a street. They were entitled to apportion those expenses amongst the owners of the properties fronting onto that street and summarily to recover from the respective owners the amounts so apportioned. In addition statute provided that such expenses should be charged on the premises in respect of which they were incurred with interest thereon at the rate of 5% until payment. It was not necessary for the amount due to be ascertained on the sale of a house before the Society had a right to receive it. The charge was imposed when the paving works were completed in 1875. The expenses were not apportioned until 1885. In 1887 a demand for payment was made on the defendant and in 1888 the local board sought to enforce the statutory charge against the defendant. The county court judge granted the order, but the Queen’s Bench Division reversed him.
Held: The appeal failed. The limitation period for a local authority to recover paving expenses ran from the time of imposition even though the charge had not yet been apportioned between the frontagers. The right to receive payment had arisen even though it could not yet enforce payment.
Lord Esher MR ‘It was strongly argued that the words ‘present right to receive the same’ in this section are equivalent to ‘present right to enforce payment of the same’. If there were some overwhelming reason why that construction should be given to the words; if that were the only construction that would render the procedure sensible, I think possibly the words might receive that construction, but I do not think it would be their ordinary meaning in the English language. A present right to receive is not in ordinary English the same as a present right to enforce payment. Then is there any overwhelming reason why we should read the words otherwise than in their natural sense? So far from that, I think that in the present case to read the words in the way suggested for the plaintiffs would raise insuperable difficulties, whereas to read them in their natural sense makes the whole legislation sensible and easier application. The difficulty that arises on the plaintiffs’ construction has been pointed out, viz., that the Board, who have to receive the money, and also to apportion the amount, would have the power to delay the application of the Statute of Limitation for any time they please. When that difficulty was presented, the plaintiffs’ Counsel endeavoured to meet it by the ingenious suggestion that, if the apportionment were not made within a reasonable time, the making of it might be enforced by mandamus; and other modes were suggested of meeting the difficulty. But why should we embark on such questions and invent means of overcoming this difficulty, when by reading the words in their ordinary sense no such difficulty arises? . . .
‘The charge exists, though the exact amount charged may not be ascertained. It is suggested that a person in whose favour a charge is imposed cannot be entitled to receive an amount which is not ascertained. I do not see why this should be so. A sum may be offered to him, which the person offering it thinks to be the right sum, and which he may also think to be the right sum, although the actual calculation of the exact amount has not been made. What is there in law, or reason, or business, to shew that he is not entitled to receive the sum when so offered to him? I cannot see any difficulty in saying that there is a present right to receive the expenses. In the case where a person has only a reversionary right to receive money, or for some other reason the time when he is entitled to receive the money has not yet arrived, it would be different, and there would be no present right to receive the money. . .
So, reading the words of the section in their ordinary sense, it seems to me that in the present case the Local Board were a body of persons in whose favour a charge existed for a sum of money, who were entitled to receive it, and who were capable of giving a receipt or discharge for it . . . It seems to me therefore that the case comes within the words of the section read in their ordinary sense and that there is no reason for giving them any other construction. Consequently the claim of the plaintiffs is barred by the Statute of Limitations.’
Lindley LJ said that expression, a ‘present right to receive’ was ‘a little ambiguous’, but agreed with Lord Esher: ‘. . . and as distinguishable, as apparently it is meant to be, from ‘present right to sue’, everything works out harmoniously; the moment the time of the coming into existence of the charge is ascertained, the period of limitation will begin to run: whereas, if the opposite construction is adopted, we are at once landed in the curious anomaly that the creditor, that is to say, the person who is entitled to the charge, can by his own act postpone his right to sue indefinitely . . .
The section is dealing with charges on land, and it must be borne in mind that such charges are present charges and future charges, reversionary charges, charges in remainder, and such like. One general form of expression is used to include the whole, and that expression is ‘present right to receive.’ It seems to me clear that the meaning is that in each case the moment to be looked to is the moment when the charge comes into present operation; for instance, when reversionary charges are being dealt with, the moment to be looked to is the moment when the reversion falls in and the charge takes effect in possession.’
Lopes LJ said that the right to receive what was secured by a charge arose concurrently with the charge: ‘When, then, does the right accrue to the person or persons in whose favour the charge is imposed to receive the amount secured by the charge? It appears to me that it accrues the moment the charge is imposed on the premises by the statute, that is when the expenses have been incurred and the works completed. It may be that certain things have to be done before the right can be enforced, but the right to receive what is secured by the charge arises concurrently with the charge. The words are ‘present right to receive’ not ‘present right to recover’. The right to receive may exist though the definite sum to be received has not yet been ascertained. There are cases where the legislature requires a notice to be given before an action can be maintained. The right of action however exists as soon as an actionable wrong has been committed, though it cannot be successfully enforced until the statutory requirements are complied with.’

Lord Esher MR, Lopes LJ, Lindley LJ
[1889] 24 QBD 1
Real Property Limitation Act 1874 8
England and Wales
Citing:
CitedFarran v Beresford HL 30-Aug-1843
The House considered the nature of scire facias, and in particular whether scire facias created a new right, or whether it only operated as a continuation of the original judgment. ‘The present right to receive the same’ was understood by Tindal . .
CitedEarle v Bellingham 24-Jul-1857
The right to receive legacies charged on a reversionary legacy payable under the will of another was not a present right to receive them until the reversionary legacy fell into possession on the death of the life tenant. . .

Cited by:
CitedThe Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea v Amanullah Khan and The Wellcome Trust ChD 13-Jun-2001
The authority had served notices on the second defendant, requiring him to execute works to bring a property up to a habitable condition. Eventually the authority executed the works themselves, and sought repayment from him of the costs. He resisted . .
CitedWilkinson and Another v West Bromwich Building Society CA 30-Jul-2004
The Society had repossessed and sold the mortgagors’ house in 1990. It knew then that there was a shortfall, but took no further recovery proceedings until 2002. What was the date from which the relevant limitation period began to run? Though the . .
DistingusihedGreen and others v Gaul and Another; In re Loftus deceased ChD 18-Mar-2005
The claimants began an action in January 2003 to seek to set aside the appointment of an administrator from December 1991, and to have set aside transfers of property made within the estate.
Held: The limitation period against a personal . .
CitedWest Bromwich Building Society v Wilkinson HL 30-Jun-2005
The Society had taken possession of a property in 1989. It located the defendants many years later and sought payment of the excess after deduction of the proceeds of sale, and for interest. The borrowers claimed the debt was expired by limitation . .
CitedDoodes v Gotham, Perry ChD 17-Nov-2005
The trustee in bankruptcy had taken a charge on the property in 1992 to support the bankruptcy in 1988. He sought to enforce it in 2005. The chargor appealed an order which denied he was protected by limitation.
Held: The appeal succeeded. . .
CitedGotham v Doodes CA 25-Jul-2006
The former bankrupt resisted sale of his property by the trustee, saying that enforcement was barred by limitation. He and his wife bought the property in early 1988, and he was made bankrupt in October 1988. He was dischaged from bankruptcy in . .

Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Limitation, Local Government

Updated: 22 January 2022; Ref: scu.182787

Richards v Worcestershire County Council and Another: ChD 28 Jul 2016

Application for claim to be struck out.

Newey J
[2016] EWHC 1954 (Ch)
Bailii
Mental Health Act 1983 2 25A 117
England and Wales
Citing:
CitedMwanza, Regina (on The Application of) v London Borough of Greenwich and Another Admn 15-Jun-2010
The claimant had been discharged from inpatient treatment under the 1983 Act, and now sought to oblige the respondent local authorities to provide the assistance he needed. . .
CitedClunis (By his Next Friend Prince) v Camden and Islington Health Authority CA 5-Dec-1997
The plaintiff had killed someone and, as a result, been convicted of manslaughter and ordered to be detained in a secure hospital when subject to after-care under section 117 of the 1983 Act. He sought damages from the health authority on the basis . .

Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Health, Local Government

Updated: 20 January 2022; Ref: scu.567847

C, T, M and U, Regina (on The Application of) v London Borough of Southwark: CA 12 Jul 2016

Appeal against the order dismissing the appellants’ claims for judicial review and damages. The claim challenged the lawfulness of the accommodation and the level of financial support provided to a family by a local authority.

Moore-Bick VP CA, Sir Ernest Ryder, Senior President of Tribunals, Vos LJ
[2016] EWCA Civ 707
Bailii
England and Wales

Housing, Benefits, Local Government

Updated: 19 January 2022; Ref: scu.566848

Hazell v Hammersmith and Fulham London Borough Council: HL 1991

Swap deals outwith Council powers

The authority entered into interest rate swap deals to protect itself against adverse money market movements. They began to lose substantial amounts when interest rates rose, and the district auditor sought a declaration that the contracts were void, there being no express power in the relevant legislation.
Held: The arrangements formed no proper part of a local authority’s statutory functions, and were therefore ultra vires, and not binding on the authority. They were not ancillary to any statutory obligation, nor were they entered into in order to support any borrowing. Section 111(1) embodies the principles relating to the powers of a company as set out in Great Eastern Railway.
The word ‘functions’ in this context ’embraces all the duties and powers of a local authority; the sum total of the activities Parliament has entrusted to it. Those activities are its functions.’
Lord Templeman said: ‘The authorities deal with widely different statutory functions but establish the general proposition that when a power is claimed to be incidental, the provisions of the statute which confer and limit functions must be considered and construed . . .The authorities also show that a power is not incidental merely because it is convenient or desirable or profitable . . ‘

Lord Templeman
[1992] 2 AC 1, [1991] 2 WLR 372, [1991] 1 All ER 545
Local Government Act 1963 1, Local Government Act 1972 111, Local Government Finance Act 1982 19
England and Wales
Citing:
AppliedAttorney-General v Mersey Railway Co HL 1906
The power to make by-laws encompasses not only a company’s principle activity, but also all incidental and ancillary activities. The incidental power cannot be used to expand the company’s activities, in this case by extending its business by . .
OverruledBilbie v Lumley and Others 28-Jun-1802
Contract Not Set Aside for Mistake as to Law
An underwriter paid a claim under a policy which he was entitled in law to repudiate for non-disclosure. Although he knew the relevant facts, he was not aware of their legal significance. He claimed back the money he had paid.
Held: A contract . .
Appeal from – ApprovedHazell v Hammersmith and Fulham London Borough Council CA 2-Jan-1990
The authority entered into interest rate swap agreements, whose validity was challenged. The court considered what were the functions of a local authority within the Act. ‘We agree with the Divisional Court that in [section 111(1)] the word . .
CitedUniversity of Wollongong v Merwally 22-Nov-1984
(High Court of Australia) Deane J said: ‘A parliament may legislate that, for the purposes of the law which it controls, past facts or past laws are to be deemed and treated as having been different to what they were. It cannot however objectively . .
At first instanceHazell v Hammersmith and Fulham London Borough Council QBD 1990
The issue before the courts was whether, in the absence of any express power authorising the Council to do so, the Council was within its power under s 111(1) of the Local Government Act 1972 to enter into certain swap transactions;
‘The fact . .
CitedTrustees of the Harbour of Dundee v D and J Nicol HL 10-Dec-1914
The pursuers challenged an initiative by the defenders which allegedly harmed their local steamer excursion business. The House was asked whether steamers acquired by a statutory body of harbour trustees who maintained a service of steamers for . .

Cited by:
CitedDeutsche Morgan Grenfell Group Plc v The Commissioners of Inland Revenue, HM Attorney General ChD 18-Jul-2003
The taxpayer sought to bring an action for restitution by the revenue of sums paid under a mistake of law. Under the Metallgesellschaft decision, rights of election for recovery of overpaid tax applied only between UK resident companies.
Held: . .
AppliedWestdeutsche Landesbank Girozentrale v Islington London Borough Council HL 22-May-1996
Simple interest only on rate swap damages
The bank had paid money to the local authority under a contract which turned out to be ultra vires and void. The question was whether, in addition to ordering the repayment of the money to the bank on unjust enrichment principles, the court could . .
CitedKleinwort Benson Ltd v Lincoln City Council etc HL 29-Jul-1998
Right of Recovery of Money Paid under Mistake
Kleinwort Benson had made payments to a local authority under swap agreements which were thought to be legally enforceable when made. Subsequently, a decision of the House of Lords, (Hazell v. Hammersmith and Fulham) established that such swap . .
CitedBrennan v Bolt Burdon and Others, London Borough of Islington, Leigh Day and Co CA 29-Jul-2004
The claimant sought damages for injury alleged to have been suffered as tenant of a house after being subjected to carbon monoxide poisoning, and also from her former solicitors for their delay in her claim. The effective question was whether the . .
CitedAkumah v London Borough of Hackney HL 3-Mar-2005
The authority set up a parking scheme for an estate of house of which it was the landlord. Those not displaying parking permits were to be clamped. The appellant complained that the regulations had been imposed by council resolution, not be the . .
CitedAttorney General v British Museum ChD 27-May-2005
The trustees brought a claim against the Attorney-General seeking clarification of their duties and powers to return objects which were part of the collection in law, but where a moral duty might exist to return it to a former owner. Here drawings . .
CitedRoberts v Parole Board HL 7-Jul-2005
Balancing Rights of Prisoner and Society
The appellant had been convicted of the murder of three police officers in 1966. His tariff of thirty years had now long expired. He complained that material put before the Parole Board reviewing has case had not been disclosed to him.
Held: . .
CitedLooe Fuels Ltd., Regina (on the Application of) v Looe Harbour Commissioners Admn 27-Apr-2007
The claimants sought judicial review of a decision of the defendant harbour masters themselves to install and sell from the harbour all fule for use by boats using it, saying that they had no power to operate such an enterprise.
Held: Whilst . .
CitedHeald and Others v London Borough of Brent CA 20-Aug-2009
The court considered whether it was lawful for a local authority to outsource the decision making on homelessness reviews. The appellants said that it could not be contracted out, and that the agent employed lacked the necessary independence and was . .
CitedHaugesund Kommune and Another v Depfa Acs Bank CA 27-May-2010
. .
CitedNational Secular Society and Another, Regina (on The Application of) v Bideford Town Council Admn 10-Feb-2012
The claimant challenged the placing of a prayer on the agenda of the respondent’s meetings.
Held: The claim succeeded. The placing of such elements on the Agenda was outside the powers given to the Council, and the action was ultra vires: . .
CitedNational Aids Trust v National Health Service Commissioning Board (NHS England) Admn 2-Aug-2016
NHS to make drug available
The claimant charity said that drugs (PrEP) prophylactic for AIDS / HIV should be made available by the defendant and through the NHS. The respndent said that the responsibility for preventative medicine for sexual health lay with local authorities. . .
CitedJJ Management Consulting Llp and Others v Revenue and Customs CA 22-Jun-2020
HMRC has power to conduct informal investigation
The taxpayer, resident here, but with substantial oversea business interests, challenged the conduct of an informal investigation of his businesses under the 2005 Act, saying that HMRC, as a creature of statute, are only permitted to do that which . .
CitedAustin, Regina (on The Application of) v Parole Board for England and Wales Admn 17-Jan-2022
Parole Board Publication Scheme Unduly Complicated
This claim for judicial review raises important issues about the lawfulness of the Parole Board’s policy and practice in relation to the provision of a summary of a Parole Board decision to victims and victims’ families and the media. The protocol . .

Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Local Government, Financial Services

Updated: 19 January 2022; Ref: scu.185823

Hazell v Hammersmith and Fulham London Borough Council: QBD 1990

The issue before the courts was whether, in the absence of any express power authorising the Council to do so, the Council was within its power under s 111(1) of the Local Government Act 1972 to enter into certain swap transactions;
‘The fact that subsection (1) is expressly made subject to ‘the provisions of this Act’ make it clear that it is important to construe section 111(1) in its context. The reference to expenditure, borrowing or lending, etc., within the brackets in the subsection do not themselves confer any power to expend, borrow or lend money, etc., but only make it clear that the fact that those activities are involved does not prevent the activities being within the power of the authority which are authorised by this subsection.
The critical part of the subsection are the words ‘calculated to facilitate, or is conducive or incidental to, the discharge of any of their functions.’ Before the subsection can authorise an activity which is not otherwise authorised there must be some other underlying function which is authorised, to the discharge of which, the activity will facilitate or be conducive or incidental.
What is a function for the purposes of the subsection is not expressly defined but in our view there can be little doubt that in this context ‘functions’ refers to the multiplicity of specific statutory activities the council is expressly or impliedly under a duty to perform or has power to perform under the other provisions of the Act of 1972 or other relevant legislation. The subsection does not of itself, independently of any other provision, authorise the performance of any activity. It only confers, as the sidenote to the section indicates, a subsidiary power. A subsidiary power which authorises an activity where some other statutory provision has vested a specific function or functions in the council and the performance of the activity will assist in some way in the discharge of that function or those functions.’

Woolf LJ and French J
[1990] 2 QB 697, [1990] 2 WLR 1038, [1990] 3 All ER 33
Local Government Act 1972 111(1)
England and Wales
Cited by:
Appeal fromHazell v Hammersmith and Fulham London Borough Council CA 2-Jan-1990
The authority entered into interest rate swap agreements, whose validity was challenged. The court considered what were the functions of a local authority within the Act. ‘We agree with the Divisional Court that in [section 111(1)] the word . .
CitedKleinwort Benson Ltd v Lincoln City Council etc HL 29-Jul-1998
Right of Recovery of Money Paid under Mistake
Kleinwort Benson had made payments to a local authority under swap agreements which were thought to be legally enforceable when made. Subsequently, a decision of the House of Lords, (Hazell v. Hammersmith and Fulham) established that such swap . .
At first instanceHazell v Hammersmith and Fulham London Borough Council HL 1991
Swap deals outwith Council powers
The authority entered into interest rate swap deals to protect itself against adverse money market movements. They began to lose substantial amounts when interest rates rose, and the district auditor sought a declaration that the contracts were . .

Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Local Government

Updated: 18 January 2022; Ref: scu.236532

Hastings Borough Council v Manolete Partners Plc: SC 27 Jul 2016

The council appealed against the decision that it is liable to pay compensation under section 106 of the Building Act 1984, for loss to a business on Hastings Pier arising from its closure during 2006 under the council’s emergency powers. The Council said that the company had been in default under section 106.
Held: There was nothing in the factors relied on in the courts below which required the words ‘in default’ to be limited to default under the 1984 Act. They were right in my view to hold that the authority had no defence in principle to the claim for compensation, not because (as they held) there was no default under the 1984 Act, but because it was not default by Stylus which led to the emergency action under section 78.

Lady Hale, Deputy President, Lord Kerr, Lord Carnwath, Lord Toulson, Lord Hodge
[2016] UKSC 50, [2016] 1 WLR 3059, [2016] WLR(D) 426, [2016] RVR 301, [2016] BLR 503, UKSC 2014/0159
Bailii, Bailii Summary, SC, SC Summary
Building Act 1984 106
England and Wales
Citing:
At TCCManolete Partners Plc v Hastings Borough Council TCC 12-Apr-2013
Application for compensation under s.106 of the Building Act 1984 for compensation as a result of the Council exercising its powers to prevent access to Hastings Pier under s.78 of the 1984 Act.
Held: The court rejected the defence, holding . .
At CAManolete Partners Plc v Hastings Borough Council CA 7-May-2014
The claimants appealed from rejection of their claim to compensation under the 1984 Act as tenants of a pier closed by the Authority. The Authority said that it had failed to comply with its leasehold obligations of repair, and was in default under . .
CitedHobbs v Winchester Corporation CA 18-Jun-1910
Meat had been seized under section 116 of the 1875 Act as unfit for human consumption. Although the butcher was acquitted of any offence under section 117 of that Act, on the grounds that he was unaware that it was unfit for consumption, it was . .
CitedLingke v Christchurch Corporation CA 1912
The householder sought compensation under the Act, for the disturbance in the laying of a drain in the highway abutting the claimant’s house and furniture shop. Because of the constraints of the work site, excavated soil had been thrown up against . .
CitedNeath Rural District Council v Williams QBD 1951
A watercourse became silted by natural causes and the local authority served an abatement notice on the landowner, who failed to respond, and when prosecuted relied on a proviso which excluded from liability ‘any person other than the person by . .
CitedGranada Theatres Ltd v Freehold Investment (Leytonstone) Ltd CA 23-Mar-1959
The tenant claimed that the landlord had failed in its obligations of repair undertaken in the lease.
Held: Where the landlord was in default, a tenant may have a right to undertake the repairs itself, recovering the costs.
Jenkins LJ . .
CitedPlace v Rawtenstall Corporation 1916
The authority had served notice under the Act requiring the plaintiff to convert a pail closet on his premises into a water closet and to connect it to a sewer. He failed to comply, and the authority carried out the work themselves, but did so by . .
CitedClayton v Sale Urban District Council 1926
Action was brought by the Council in respect of an alleged statutory nuisance caused by flooding. Under section 94 of the 1875 Act they could serve an abatement notice on the person by whose ‘act default or sufferance’ the nuisance had arisen. The . .

Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Local Government

Updated: 17 January 2022; Ref: scu.567605

Regina v North and East Devon Health Authority ex parte Coughlan and Secretary of State for Health Intervenor and Royal College of Nursing Intervenor: CA 16 Jul 1999

Consultation to be Early and Real Listening

The claimant was severely disabled as a result of a road traffic accident. She and others were placed in an NHS home for long term disabled people and assured that this would be their home for life. Then the health authority decided that they were in need of only ‘general’ rather than ‘specialist’ nursing services and that these should be purchased by the local authority rather than provided by the NHS. So the health authority decided to close the home and transfer their long-term care to the local authority.
The need for nursing care for a chronically sick person might be primarily a health or a social services need, and either a health authority or a social service authority might be responsible for the care provision, and if the local authority is responsible, then a charge might be made. However where the need of a patient was primarily for health care as such, it was wrong for the health authority to seek to transfer responsibility to the local authority.
The court set out three categories of legitimate expectation, including substantive entitlement, and procedural unfairness.
Lord Woolf MR said: ‘To be proper, consultation must be undertaken at a time when proposals are still at a formative stage; it must include sufficient reasons for particular proposals to allow those consulted to give intelligent consideration and an intelligent response; adequate time must be given for this purpose; and the product of consultation must be conscientiously taken into account when the ultimate decision is taken . . It has to be remembered that consultation is not litigation: the consulting authority is not required to publicise every submission it receives or (absent some statutory obligation) to disclose all its advice. Its obligation is to let those who have a potential interest in the subject matter know in clear terms what the proposal is and exactly why it is under positive consideration, telling them enough (which may be a good deal) to enable them to make an intelligent response. The obligation, although it may be quite onerous, goes no further than this.’
Lord Woolf discussed the doctrine of legitimate expectation, saying: ‘the doctrine of legitimate expectation has emerged as a distinct application of the doctrine of abuse of power’, and ‘Legitimate expectation may play different parts in different aspects of public law. The limits to its role have yet to be finally determined by the courts . . And without injury to the Wednesbury doctrine it may furnish a proper basis for the application of the now established concept of abuse of power . . Once it is recognised that conduct which is an abuse of power is contrary to law its existence must be for the court to determine.’ and ‘it is for the court to say whether the consequent frustration of the individual’s expectation is so unfair as to be a misuse of the authority’s power.’
and ‘Where the court considers that a lawful promise or practice has induced a legitimate expectation of a benefit which is substantive, not simply procedural, authority now establishes that . . the court will in a proper case decide whether to frustrate the expectation is so unfair that to take a new and different course will amount to an abuse of power. Here, once the legitimacy of the expectation is established, the court will have the task of weighing the requirements of fairness against any overriding interest relied upon for the change of policy.’

Lord Woolf MR
Times 20-Jul-1999, Gazette 11-Aug-1999, [1999] EWCA Civ 1870, [1999] EWCA Civ 1871, [2001] 1 QB 213, [1999] Lloyds LR 305, (2000) 51 BMLR 1, (1999) 2 CCL Rep 285, [2000] 3 All ER 850, (2000) 2 LGLR 1, [1999] BLGR 703, [2000] 2 WLR 622, [1999] Lloyd’s Rep Med 306
Bailii, Bailii
National Health Service Act 1977
England and Wales
Citing:
Appeal fromRegina v North and East Devon Health Authority ex parte Coughlan Admn 11-Dec-1998
There had been no transfer to Social Service Authorities of the Health Services’ statutory duty to provide specialist nursing and related care to the elderly, and having made a promise to provide a home for life, the Health Authority would be held . .
CitedWestern Fish Products Ltd v Penwith District Council and Another CA 22-May-1978
Estoppel Cannot Oust Statutory Discretion
The plaintiff had been refused planning permission for a factory. The refusals were followed by the issue of Enforcement Notices and Stop Notices. The plaintiff said that they had been given re-assurances upon which they had relied.
Held: The . .
CitedRegina v Brent London Borough Council ex parte Gunning 1985
The demands of fair consultation procedures will vary from case to case and will depend on the factors involved. The requirements are: ‘First, that consultation must be at a time when proposals are still at a formative stage. Second, that the . .

Cited by:
CitedBloggs 61, Regina (on the Application of) v Secretary of State for the Home Department CA 18-Jun-2003
The applicant sought review of a decision to remove him from a witness protection scheme within the prison. He claimed that having been promised protection, he had a legitimate expectation of protection, having been told he would receive protection . .
CitedSporting Options Plc, Regina (on the Application Of) v Horserace Betting Levy Board Admn 31-Jul-2003
The claimant sought judicial review of the rate of levy set by the respondent, saying that they operated a new kind of system which was treated unfairly.
Held: The procedure followed in settling the levy was unsatisfactory. The claimant would . .
CitedI-CD Publishing Ltd v The Secretary of State, The Information Commissioner (Interested Party) Admn 21-Jul-2003
The claimant sought judicial review challenging the restrictions on the sale of electoral registers to registered credit reference agencies. Following Robertson (1) the new regulations created two registers, and the claimant sought to be able to . .
CitedWatts, Regina (on the Application of) v Bedford Primary Care Trust and others Admn 1-Oct-2003
The claimant sought hip-replacement treatment. She was first told that she would have to wait a year. As her lawyers pressed the respondent, she looked at obtaining treatment in France. As she decided to take the treatment, the respondent reduced . .
CitedNorth West Lancashire Health Authority v A D and G CA 29-Jul-1999
A decision not to fund gender re-assignment surgery was operated as a blanket policy without proper regard for individual cases and so was unlawful as an effective fetter on the discretion which the Health Authority was obliged to exercise. A lawful . .
CitedRegina v Department of Education and Employment ex parte Begbie CA 20-Aug-1999
A statement made by a politician as to his intentions on a particular matter if elected could not create a legitimate expectation as regards the delivery of the promise after elected, even where the promise would directly affect individuals, and the . .
CitedRowland v The Environment Agency CA 19-Dec-2003
The claimant owned a house by the river Thames at Hedsor Water. Public rights of navigation existed over the Thames from time immemorial, and its management lay with the respondent. Landowners at Hedsor had sought to assert that that stretch was now . .
CitedMullen, Regina (on the Application of) v Secretary of State for the Home Department HL 29-Apr-2004
The claimant had been imprisoned, but his conviction was later overturned. He had been a victim of a gross abuse of executive power. The British authorities had acted in breach of international law and had been guilty of ‘a blatant and extremely . .
CitedCapenhurst and Others, Regina (on the Application Of) v Leicester City Council Admn 15-Sep-2004
The applicants, representatives of voluntary organisations, challenged decisions of the local authority to withdraw their funding, saying the decision making process had been unfair.
Held: Even if it was not bound to consult, if the authority . .
CitedRashid, Regina (on the Application Of) v Secretary of State for Home Department Admn 22-Oct-2004
The claimant sought asylum, being an Iraqi Kurd. He was not told by the defendant of its policy not to require internal relocation within the Kurdish autonomous zone. The policy had been applied for the benefit of others, as was revealed only in . .
CitedRegina v Secretary of State for the Home Department, Ex Parte Hindley HL 30-Mar-2000
The prisoner, sentenced to life imprisonment with a whole life tariff for the murders of children, now appealed against the imposition of the whole life tarriff.
Held: The appeal failed. It was possible for a Home Secretary to set a whole life . .
CitedRashid, Regina (on the Application of) v Secretary of State for the Home Department CA 16-Jun-2005
The Home Secretary appealed against a grant of a judicial review to the respondent who had applied for asylum. The court had found that two other asylum applicants had been granted leave to remain on similar facts and on the appellants, and that it . .
CitedRegina (Nadarajah) v Secretary of State for the Home Department; Abdi v Secretary of State for the Home Department CA 22-Nov-2005
The asylum applicant challenged a certificate given by the respondent that the claim for asylum was manifestly ill-founded. The respondent had made a mistake in applying the appropriate policy, but had sought to correct the error. The claimants . .
CitedGrogan, Regina (on the Application of) v Bexley NHS Care Trust and others Admn 25-Jan-2006
The claimant was elderly and in need of care in a nursing home. She claimed that her care needs had been assessed by an unlawful protocol applied by the health authority. She said that she qualified under the criteria for Continuing Health Care.
CitedRogers, Regina (on the Application of) v Secretary of State for Health Admn 15-Feb-2006
The claimant suffered breast cancer. She sought treatment from the defendant with a drug called Herceptin, and now sought judicial review of the refusal of such treatment. Various stages in the licensing of the drug were yet to be completed. It was . .
CitedLindley, Regina (on the Application of) v Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council Admn 21-Sep-2006
The claimant, aged 69 suffered from cerebral palsy. The council had provided his care but he said they had represented to him that care would be provided in a new facility, and claimed a legitimate expectation. The defendant said that its changed . .
CitedEisai Ltd, Regina (on the Application of) v National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) and Shire Pharmaceuticals Limited and Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry (Interveners) CA 1-May-2008
The applicant pharmaceutical companies challenged the decision of the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) to to list certain drugs saying that the procedure adopted was unfair. NICE had revealed that results of calculations it had made . .
CitedEdwards, Regina (on the application of) v Environment Agency HL 16-Apr-2008
The applicants sought to challenge the grant of a permit by the defendant to a company to operate a cement works, saying that the environmental impact assessment was inadequate.
Held: The Agency had been justified in allowing the application . .
CitedGreen, Regina (on the Application of) v South West Strategic Health Authority Admn 28-Oct-2008
The claimant said that whilst resident in a care home, her care should have been paid for as health care under ‘Continuing Health Care.’ She said that the decision maker had failed to comply with the Health Authorities guidelines.
Held: In . .
CitedOxfam v Revenue and Customs ChD 27-Nov-2009
The charity appealed against refusal to allow it to reclaim input VAT. It also sought judicial review of the decision of the Tribunal not to allow it to raise an argument of legitimate expectation. The charity had various subsidiaries conducting . .
CitedGrimsby Institute of Further and Higher Education, Regina (on The Application of) v Learning and Skills Council Admn 12-Aug-2010
The applicant had applied to the respondent for funding for new buildings. The application was approved, but the application was rejected when the respondent ran out of funds. The claimant said that a legitimate expectation had been created, and . .
CitedLumba (WL) v Secretary of State for The Home Department SC 23-Mar-2011
The claimants had been detained under the 1971 Act, after completing sentences of imprisonment pending their return to their home countries under deportations recommended by the judges at trial, or chosen by the respondent. They challenged as . .
CitedLondon Borough of Lewisham and Others), Regina (on The Application of) v Assessment and Qualifications Alliance and Others Admn 13-Feb-2013
Judicial review was sought of the changes to the marking systems for GCSE English in 2012.
Held: The claim failed. Though properly brought, the failure was in the underlying structue of the qualification, and not in the respondent’s attempts . .
CitedSave Our Surgery Ltd, Regina (on The Application of) v Joint Committee of Primary Care Trusts Admn 7-Mar-2013
The claimants sought judicial review of the report prepared by the defendants under which departments providing childrens’ heart surgery at their regional hospital would close. They complained that the consultation had been inadequate and flawed. . .
CitedBancoult, Regina (on The Application of) v Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs Admn 11-Jun-2013
The claimant, displaced from the Chagos Archipelago, challenged a decision by the respondent to create a no-take Marine Protected Area arround the island which would make life there impossible if he and others returned. The respondent renewed his . .
CitedBadger Trust, Regina (on The Application of) v Secretary of State for Environment Food and Rural Affairs Admn 29-Aug-2014
The respondent had carried out the first round of a badger cull, subject to supervision and reporting by an independent expert panel. Promoises were made, the claimant said, that the panel’s role would be maintained for any subsequent round. The . .
CitedBirks, Regina (On the Application of) v Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis Admn 25-Sep-2014
The claimant police officer sought judicial review of a decision to continue his suspension. He had been investigated and cleared after a death in custody. He sought to join the Church of England Ministry and was offered a post. He was re-assured . .
CitedMoseley, Regina (on The Application of) v London Borough of Haringey SC 29-Oct-2014
Consultation requirements
The claimant challenged a decision of the respondent reducing the benefits under the Council Tax Reduction Scheme reducing Council Tax for those in need, saying that the Council’s consultation had been inadequate.
Held: The consultation was . .
CitedA and B, Regina (on The Application of) v Secretary of State for Health SC 14-Jun-2017
The court was asked: ‘Was it unlawful for the Secretary of State for Health, the respondent, who had power to make provisions for the functioning of the National Health Service in England, to have failed to make a provision which would have enabled . .
CitedForge Care Homes Ltd and Others, Regina (on The Application of) v Cardiff and Vale University Health Board and Others SC 2-Aug-2017
The court was asked who is legally responsible for paying for the work done by registered nurses in social rather than health care settings. Is the National Health Service responsible for all the work they do or are the social care funders . .
CitedGallaher Group Ltd and Others, Regina (on The Application of) v The Competition and Markets Authority SC 16-May-2018
No Administrative Duty of Equal Treatment
Extent and consequences of duties of ‘equal treatment’ or ‘fairness’, said to have been owed by the Office of Fair Trading to those subject to investigation under the Competition Act 1998. The respondent had entered negotiations with several parties . .
CitedFinucane, Re Application for Judicial Review SC 27-Feb-2019
(Northern Ireland) The deceased solicitor was murdered in his home in 1989, allegedly by loyalists. They had never been identified, though collusion between security forces and a loyalist paramilitary was established. The ECHR and a judge led . .

Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Health, Local Government, Administrative

Leading Case

Updated: 16 January 2022; Ref: scu.146786

Manolete Partners Plc v Hastings Borough Council: CA 7 May 2014

The claimants appealed from rejection of their claim to compensation under the 1984 Act as tenants of a pier closed by the Authority. The Authority said that it had failed to comply with its leasehold obligations of repair, and was in default under that Act.
Held: Default was limited to default under the 1984 Act. Earlier statutes had included defaults under related statutes, but: ‘The phrase ‘in default’ in section 106 of the 1984 Act means in breach of an obligation arising under the 1984 Act. The provision does not require the court or the arbitrator to conduct a wide-ranging review of other legislation and the common law in order to see whether the claimant is in breach of any duties arising outside the 1984 Act.’
. . And: ‘[Stylus] has acted responsibly at all stages. It did its utmost to compel the landlord to carry out remedial works. Ultimately it stepped into the breach and did the works itself. If the local authority had wished to avoid liability to pay compensation under section 106, it could have brought proceedings under section 77 of the 1984 Act sooner and thereby avoided the need to take emergency action under section 78.
Finally, on this point, [the council’s] general arguments will still be available at the quantum hearing before the arbitrator. The local authority will be entitled to argue that even if it had not fenced off the pier, [Stylus] could have made little use of its two units.’
The default proviso was the ‘control mechanism which eliminated claims that are unacceptable on grounds of public policy’. It left no room for the application of the ex turpi causa rule: ‘Having said that, I do accept that the structural condition of the pier will be relevant to the quantum of the claim. The local authority will be entitled to argue in the arbitration due to be held under section 106(2) that the loss of profit caused by the local authority’s conduct must be substantially reduced by reason of the structural condition of the pier. Indeed the local authority would be entitled to argue that the quantum is reduced to nil, although on the evidence which I have seen that outcome seems unlikely.’

Jackson LJ, Aikens LJ, PattenLJ
[2014] EWCA Civ 562, [2014] 1 WLR 4030, [2014] WLR(D) 193, [2014] BLR 389
Bailii, WLRD
Building Act 1984
England and Wales
Citing:
At TCCManolete Partners Plc v Hastings Borough Council TCC 12-Apr-2013
Application for compensation under s.106 of the Building Act 1984 for compensation as a result of the Council exercising its powers to prevent access to Hastings Pier under s.78 of the 1984 Act.
Held: The court rejected the defence, holding . .
CitedHobbs v Winchester Corporation CA 18-Jun-1910
Meat had been seized under section 116 of the 1875 Act as unfit for human consumption. Although the butcher was acquitted of any offence under section 117 of that Act, on the grounds that he was unaware that it was unfit for consumption, it was . .
CitedLingke v Christchurch Corporation CA 1912
The householder sought compensation under the Act, for the disturbance in the laying of a drain in the highway abutting the claimant’s house and furniture shop. Because of the constraints of the work site, excavated soil had been thrown up against . .
CitedLeonidis v Thames Water Authority 1979
Access to the plaintiff’s motor repair business was interfered with by work to reconstruct a sewer. Whilst access was still possible it required a long detour and there was no physical interference with the entrance to the premises.
Held: If a . .

Cited by:
At CAHastings Borough Council v Manolete Partners Plc SC 27-Jul-2016
The council appealed against the decision that it is liable to pay compensation under section 106 of the Building Act 1984, for loss to a business on Hastings Pier arising from its closure during 2006 under the council’s emergency powers. The . .

Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Local Government

Updated: 14 January 2022; Ref: scu.525117

Manolete Partners Plc v Hastings Borough Council: TCC 12 Apr 2013

Application for compensation under s.106 of the Building Act 1984 for compensation as a result of the Council exercising its powers to prevent access to Hastings Pier under s.78 of the 1984 Act.
Held: The court rejected the defence, holding that the reference to ‘default’ should be read as default in respect of obligations imposed by the 1984 Act itself: ‘If that is not so and if it were necessary to see whether a party was in breach of any provision of other statutes, as is submitted here, then the scope of enquiry would be large and would require investigation of further factual matters to determine whether there was a default in terms of those statutes.’

Ramsey J
[20131 EWHC 842 (TCC), [2013] BLR 361, [2013] RVR 241, [2013] 2 EGLR 17
Bailii
Building Act 1984, Occupiers Liability Act 1957
England and Wales
Citing:
CitedLingke v Christchurch Corporation CA 1912
The householder sought compensation under the Act, for the disturbance in the laying of a drain in the highway abutting the claimant’s house and furniture shop. Because of the constraints of the work site, excavated soil had been thrown up against . .
CitedHobbs v Winchester Corporation CA 18-Jun-1910
Meat had been seized under section 116 of the 1875 Act as unfit for human consumption. Although the butcher was acquitted of any offence under section 117 of that Act, on the grounds that he was unaware that it was unfit for consumption, it was . .
CitedNeath Rural District Council v Williams QBD 1951
A watercourse became silted by natural causes and the local authority served an abatement notice on the landowner, who failed to respond, and when prosecuted relied on a proviso which excluded from liability ‘any person other than the person by . .
CitedGranada Theatres Ltd v Freehold Investment (Leytonstone) Ltd CA 23-Mar-1959
The tenant claimed that the landlord had failed in its obligations of repair undertaken in the lease.
Held: Where the landlord was in default, a tenant may have a right to undertake the repairs itself, recovering the costs.
Jenkins LJ . .
CitedLeonidis v Thames Water Authority 1979
Access to the plaintiff’s motor repair business was interfered with by work to reconstruct a sewer. Whilst access was still possible it required a long detour and there was no physical interference with the entrance to the premises.
Held: If a . .
CitedSecretary of State for Communities and Local Government and Another v Welwyn Hatfield Borough Council SC 6-Apr-2011
The land-owner had planning permission to erect a barn, conditional on its use for agricultural purposes. He built inside it a house and lived there from 2002. In 2006. He then applied for a certificate of lawful use. The inspector allowed it, and . .

Cited by:
At TCCManolete Partners Plc v Hastings Borough Council CA 7-May-2014
The claimants appealed from rejection of their claim to compensation under the 1984 Act as tenants of a pier closed by the Authority. The Authority said that it had failed to comply with its leasehold obligations of repair, and was in default under . .
At TCCHastings Borough Council v Manolete Partners Plc SC 27-Jul-2016
The council appealed against the decision that it is liable to pay compensation under section 106 of the Building Act 1984, for loss to a business on Hastings Pier arising from its closure during 2006 under the council’s emergency powers. The . .

Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Construction, Local Government

Updated: 14 January 2022; Ref: scu.472588

Branwood, Regina (on The Application of) v The Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government: Admn 26 Apr 2013

This case concerns a Local Council Tax Support scheme and adherence by a local council to the duty to consult and the public sector equality duty.

Haddon-Cave J
[2013] EWHC 1024 (Admin)
Bailii
England and Wales

Local Government, Rating

Updated: 14 January 2022; Ref: scu.523761

AK, (A Child), Regina (on The Application of) v The London Borough of Islington and Another: Admn 16 Feb 2021

Claim by AK against the London Borough of Islington (Children Services Department) and the North Central London Clinical Commissioning Group alleging that the defendants failed to adequately assess and plan for her needs following her discharge from hospital pursuant to s.117 of the Mental Health Act 1983

His Honour Judge Lickley QC Sitting as a Deputy Judge of the High Court
[2021] EWHC 301 (Admin)
Bailii
England and Wales

Local Government, Health

Updated: 13 January 2022; Ref: scu.658622

Swindon Borough Council v Webb (T/A Protective Coatings): CA 16 Mar 2016

The Council brought this unusual appeal pursuant to its powers as a General Enforcer under section 213 of the Enterprise Act 2002 to seek to restrain domestic infringements harmful to the collective interests of consumers.

Tomlinson, Lewison LJJ
[2016] EWCA Civ 152
Bailii
Enterprise Act 2002 213
England and Wales

Consumer, Local Government

Updated: 12 January 2022; Ref: scu.561127

Wm Weir, Esq of Waygateshaw v Arthur Naismith, John Syme, Charles Hamilton, Wm Cullen, Jas Hamilton, William Allan, and Others: HL 3 Mar 1743

At a time of famine, when meal was scarce, a riot took place in the burgh of Hamilton, whereby the appellant’s granaries were broken into, and his meal carried off: Held the magistrates, William Cullen and Charles Hamilton, not liable to make good the damages, having not had any accession to, or connivance with, the rioters, but having done all in their power to prevent it: reversed in the House of Lords, and held them liable as having failed and neglected to perform their duty, and connived at the said riot. Also held William Allan and some others liable as having taken a part in the riot. Quoad ultra affirmed.

[1743] UKHL 6 – Paton – 678, (1743) 6 Paton 678
Bailii
Scotland

Local Government, Crime

Updated: 12 January 2022; Ref: scu.556796

Gibson v East Riding of Yorkshire District Council: EAT 3 Feb 1999

The Working Time Directive has direct application in the employment by an emanation of the state – a local authority, and an hourly paid part timer was entitled to four weeks paid holiday by the direct effect application of the Directive, and irrespective of any ambiguity or deficit in the implementing regulations.

Times 12-Feb-1999, Gazette 31-Mar-1999, [1999] UKEAT 526 – 98 – 0302
Bailii
Working Time Directive 93/104/EC OJ 1993 L307/18
England and Wales
Citing:
See AlsoGibson v East Riding Yorkshire Council EAT 3-Jul-1998
. .

Cited by:
Appeal fromEast Riding of Yorkshire Council v Lorraine Gibson CA 21-Jun-2000
The European Directive which created rights for workers to minimum holidays, was not sufficiently precise to allow it to have direct effect, and so give rise to an individual’s right to sue an employer under its provisions directly. The Directive . .

Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Employment, European, Local Government

Updated: 12 January 2022; Ref: scu.80815

Clift v Slough Borough Council and Another: QBD 6 Jul 2009

The claimant sought damages for defamation. The council had decided that she had threatened a member of staff and notified various people, and entered her name on a violent persons register. She alleged malice, the council pleaded justification and qualified privilege. She also complained of the breach of her data protection rights. She had been angry with a council official and admitted that she might have been violent to her if they had met.
Held: Several of the publications did attract qualified privilege, since the staff might possibly come in contact with the claimant, but not many others. The council owed no duty of care to some recipients, and the publication was disproportionate. The claim therefore succeeded in part.
The placing of the claimant on the register did engage her Article 8 rights. The claimant accepted that there was a legitimate aim, but that the path chosen was disproportionate. There was no risk to people working in departments which the claimant had no reason to be in contact with. A publication could be excessive either when published to someone to whom no duty was owed, or where the necessary relationship between the parties is absent or secondly where the publication incorporates irrelevant information that is not necessary for the performance of the particular duty or the protection of the particular interest upon which the privilege is founded.

Tugendhat J
[2009] EWHC 1550 (QB)
Bailii
Data Protection Act 1998, European Convention on Human Rights, Human Rights Act 1998 6(1)
England and Wales
Citing:
CitedWood v West Midlands Police QBD 8-Dec-2003
The claimant’s busness partner had been investigated by the police. He claimed in defamation after a senior officer circulated business associates and others informing them of the prosecution and suggesting the partners’s guilt. He said he was . .
CitedWood v Chief Constable West Midlands Police CA 8-Dec-2004
The claimant was a director of a limited company. A Detective Chief Inspector with responsibility for crime prevention was investigating a series of car thefts and arrested the claimant’s business partner and, before the accused had even stood his . .
CitedW v Westminster City Council and Others QBD 9-Dec-2004
The claimant sought to bring an action for defamation based upon communications made in a child protection conference. The reference was in a Report for Conference to be held pursuant to the duties imposed on local authorities by the Children Act . .
CitedRegina v Chief Constable of North Wales Police and Others Ex Parte Thorpe and Another; Regina v Chief Constable for North Wales Police Area and others ex parte AB and CB CA 18-Mar-1998
Public Identification of Pedophiles by Police
AB and CB had been released from prison after serving sentences for sexual assaults on children. They were thought still to be dangerous. They moved about the country to escape identification, and came to be staying on a campsite. The police sought . .
CitedX and Y v The Netherlands ECHR 26-Mar-1985
A parent complained to the police about a sexual assault on his daughter a mentally defective girl of 16. The prosecutor’s office decided not to prosecute provided the accused did not repeat the offence. X appealed against the decision and requested . .
CitedRegina v Chief Constable of North Wales Police and Others Ex Parte Thorpe and Another; Regina v Chief Constable for North Wales Police Area and others ex parte AB and CB CA 18-Mar-1998
Public Identification of Pedophiles by Police
AB and CB had been released from prison after serving sentences for sexual assaults on children. They were thought still to be dangerous. They moved about the country to escape identification, and came to be staying on a campsite. The police sought . .
CitedKearns and Others v The General Council of the Bar CA 17-Mar-2003
The claimants had sought to recover from the General Council of the Bar damages for libel in a communication from the head of the Bar Council’s Professional Standards and Legal Services Department to all heads of chambers, their senior clerks and . .
CitedW v JH and Another QBD 5-Mar-2008
The claimant had been an employee of the defendant council. A complaint had been made about his conduct in 1993 and 1994. A disciplinary hearing had been held and the claimant was issued with a final warning to be placed on his file. The . .
CitedHuang v Secretary of State for the Home Department HL 21-Mar-2007
Appellate Roles – Human Rights – Families Split
The House considered the decision making role of immigration appellate authorities when deciding appeals on Human Rights grounds, against refusal of leave to enter or remain, under section 65. In each case the asylum applicant had had his own . .
CitedDowntex v Flatley CA 2-Oct-2003
The claimants sought damages for defamation and breach of contract. The claimants had purchased a business from the defendant, which contract included a clause requiring the defendant to say nothing damaging about the business. The defendant . .
CitedGreene v Associated Newspapers Ltd CA 5-Nov-2004
The claimant appealed against refusal of an order restraining publication by the respondent of an article about her. She said that it was based upon an email falsely attributed to her.
Held: ‘in an action for defamation a court will not impose . .
CitedIn re S (a Child) (Identification: Restrictions on Publication) HL 28-Oct-2004
Inherent High Court power may restrain Publicity
The claimant child’s mother was to be tried for the murder of his brother by poisoning with salt. It was feared that the publicity which would normally attend a trial, would be damaging to S, and an application was made for reporting restrictions to . .
CitedToogood v Spyring 1834
Qualified Privilege of Bona Fide Words Under Duty
The defence of qualified privilege arises where the statement in question was bona fide and without malicious intent to injure: ‘In general, an action lies for the malicious publication of statements which are false in fact, and injurious to the . .
CitedCoxhead v Richards 31-Jan-1846
A complaint was made as to a warning of suspected misconduct of ship’s captain communicated to a shipowner. It did not involve a risk to the life of those on board, but the court considered what the position might have been if it had. Cresswell J . .
CitedBowen v Hall 1881
The law of libel does not provide for declarations of falsity: ‘It is better for the general good that individuals should occasionally suffer than that freedom of communication between persons in certain relations should be in any way impeded. But . . .
CitedStuart v Bell CA 1891
Lindley LJ suggested that a moral or social duty meant ‘a duty recognised by English people of ordinary intelligence and moral principle, but at the same time not a duty enforceable by legal proceedings, whether civil or criminal’.
The . .
CitedAdam v Ward HL 1917
The plaintiff, Major Adam MP, falsely attacked General Scobell in a speech in the House of Commons, thus bringing his charge into the national arena. The Army Council investigated the charge, rejected it and directed their secretary, Sir E Ward, the . .
CitedSpring v Guardian Assurance Plc and Others HL 7-Jul-1994
The plaintiff, who worked in financial services, complained of the terms of the reference given by his former employer. Having spoken of his behaviour towards members of the team, it went on: ‘his former superior has further stated he is a man of . .
DistinguishedHorrocks v Lowe HL 1974
The plaintiff complained of an alleged slander spoken at a meeting of the Town Council. The council meeting was an occasion attracting qualified privilege. The judge at trial found that the councillor honestly believed that what he had said in the . .
CitedLoutchansky v The Times Newspapers Ltd and Others (Nos 2 to 5) CA 5-Dec-2001
Two actions for defamation were brought by the claimant against the defendant. The publication reported in detail allegations made against the claimant of criminal activities including money-laundering on a vast scale. They admitted the defamatory . .

Cited by:
CitedFlood v Times Newspapers Ltd CA 13-Jul-2010
The claimant police officer complained of an article he said was defamatory in saying he was being investigated for allegations of accepting bribes. The article remained on the internet even after he was cleared. Each party appealed interim orders. . .
CitedClift v Slough Borough Council CA 21-Dec-2010
The court was asked how, if at all, the Human Rights Act 1998 has affected a local authority’s defence of qualified privilege in defamation cases. The claimant had been placed on the Council’s Violent Persons Register after becoming very upset and . .

Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Defamation, Information, Local Government, Human Rights

Updated: 12 January 2022; Ref: scu.347445

Edwards and Others, Regina (on The Application of) v Birmingham City Council: Admn 8 Feb 2016

‘Each of the Claimants made an application to the Council for housing as a homeless person. They each claim that the manner in which the Council dealt with his or her application was unlawful; and, further, that that manner reflected systemic failings. They say that the Council, advertently or inadvertently, both in their own specific cases and generally, discourage and divert applications so that individuals are denied their statutory rights to have their situation properly inquired into and be given interim accommodation whilst those inquiries are being made.’

Hickinbottom J
[2016] EWHC 173 (Admin)
Bailii
England and Wales

Housing, Local Government

Updated: 10 January 2022; Ref: scu.559672

MM, Regina (on The Application of) v London Borough of Hounslow: Admn 18 Dec 2015

In this claim for judicial review, it is alleged that Hounslow failed to produce a lawful assessment of MM’s needs, and to the extent that Hounslow’s assessment lawfully identified MM’s needs and those of his mother as his carer, it is said that Hounslow failed to make adequate provision for how those needs were to be met.

Sir Brian Keith
[2015] EWHC 3731 (Admin)
Bailii
England and Wales

Children, Local Government

Updated: 08 January 2022; Ref: scu.557375

Isle of Wight Council and Others v HM Revenue and Customs: CA 16 Dec 2015

The court was asked as to the issue of principle whether a local authority which charges members of the public for off-street car parking is a non-taxable person for VAT purposes. This turns on whether treating the authority as a non-taxable person ‘would lead to significant distortions of competition’ within the meaning of Article 4.5(2) of the Sixth Council Directive of 17 May 1977 (77/388/EEC).

Sir Terence Etherton Ch, Underhill, David Richards LJJ
[2015] EWCA Civ 1303, [2015] WLR(D) 531
Bailii, WLRD
England and Wales

Local Government, VAT, European

Updated: 08 January 2022; Ref: scu.557084

Bedford Land Investments Ltd, Regina (on The Application of) v Secretary of State for Transport and Another: Admn 3 Nov 2015

Application for judicial review of a decision by the defendant in a decision letter dated 3 December 2013 to refuse the claimant’s application for an award of costs against the interested party (IP). The costs relate to the claimant’s abortive expenditure in objecting to a Compulsory Purchase Order (CPO) and Side Roads Order (SRO) which the IP had made but subsequently withdrew.

Patterson DBE J
[2015] EWHC 3159 (Admin)
Bailii

Land, Local Government

Updated: 05 January 2022; Ref: scu.554286

Regina (Webster) v Swindon Local Safeguarding Children Board: Admn 22 Oct 2009

The claimant sought judicial review of a decision by the defendant board to await the outcome of civil proceedings before commencing a serious case review of the authority’s handling of an attack on the claimant while at school.
Held: The procedure adopted would introduce inevitable and substantial delay in such investigations which would in turn deprive the review of any practical value. Review granted.

Kenneth Parker J
[2009] EWHC 2755 (Admin), Times 06-Nov-2009
Bailii
England and Wales

Local Government

Updated: 05 January 2022; Ref: scu.377734

The Queen v Charles Tatham: 28 Jan 1858

Under the Nuisances Removal Act for England, 1865 (18 and 19 Vict. c. 181), the Local Authority in a district who have rendered innocuous a drain passing through their district, conveying away the filth of houses in a higher district, have no power to assess the owners of those houses for payment of the expences, though those houses use this drain. The power of assessment of a local authority is confined to property within the district for which they act.

[1858] EngR 287, (1858) 8 El and Bl 915, (1858) 120 ER 342
Commonlii
England and Wales

Local Government

Updated: 03 January 2022; Ref: scu.288758

Hunt v North Somerset Council: SC 22 Jul 2015

The appellant had sought judicial review of a decision of the respondent to approve a Revenue Budget for 2012/13 as to the provision of youth services. He applied for declarations that the respondent had failed to comply with section 149 of the Equality Act 2010 and section 507B of the Education Act 1996 and for an order quashing the decision to approve the budget.
Held: Where a court finds for a claimant on the substantive elements and refuses a remedy for the sole reason that it was too late to reverse the decision (here the adoption of the budget for a financial year which had expired) the court should look at the claimant as a successful party when considering the award of costs.
As to the costs appeal: ‘the Court of Appeal said that it reached its decision as a matter of principle, treating the respondent as the ‘successful party’. In adopting that approach, I consider that the court fell into error. The rejection of the respondent’s case on the two issues on which the appellant was given leave to appeal was of greater significance than merely that the respondent had increased the costs of the appeal by its unsuccessful resistance. The respondent was ‘successful’ only in the limited sense that the findings of failure came too late to do anything about what had happened in the past, not because the appellant had been slow to raise them but because the respondent had resisted them successfully until the Court of Appeal gave its judgment. The respondent was unsuccessful on the substantive issues regarding its statutory responsibilities.’

Baroness Hale of Richmond DPSC, Lord Wilson, Lord Reed, Lord Hughes, Lord Toulson JJSC
[2015] UKSC 51, [2015] WLR(D) 331, UKSC 2014/0023
Bailii, Bailii Summary, WLRD, SC, SC Summary
Equality Act 2010 149, Education Act 1996 507B
England and Wales
Citing:
At First InstanceHunt v North Somerset Council Admn 18-Jul-2012
The claimant who required support from the Council for his ADHD disorder challenged the respondent’s budget insofar as it limited support for children’s services in the Revenue Budget. Ge said that in making its decision to cut the budget, the . .
Appeal fromHunt, Regina (on The Application of) v North Somerset Council CA 6-Nov-2013
Appeal against an order dismissing the challenge by the appellant, to the lawfulness of the decision of the respondent, the Council to cut its Youth Services budget for the year 2012/2013. The claimant suffered ADHD and relied on services supported . .
Costs at CAHunt, Regina (on The Application of) v North Somerset Council CA 21-Nov-2013
Reasons for costs order made on failure of the claimant’s applications.
Held: The respondent should be entitled to recover half of its costs of the appeal. Rimer LJ said that by the time that the appeal came on for hearing, it was far too late . .

Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Local Government, Education, Judicial Review, Costs

Updated: 02 January 2022; Ref: scu.550392

IM Properties Development Ltd v Lichfield District Council and Others: Admn 20 Jul 2015

Application to quash local plan alleging: ‘ (1) the planning inspector appointed to conduct the examination into the local plan erred in failing to determine whether the Council’s sustainability appraisal complied with the relevant legal and procedural requirements; (2) the sustainability appraisal and the process of consideration of alternatives by the Council and the planning inspector were legally flawed and unfair; (3) the planning inspector adopted the wrong approach when considering whether it was appropriate to alter the green belt boundaries by releasing the Deanslade Farm and Cricket Lane sites for housing; and (4) the Council had no power to adopt the local plan with the main modifications proposed in respect of the green belt sites, since this departed fundamentally from the spatial strategy it originally set out. ‘

Cranston J
[2015] EWHC 2077 (Admin), [2015] WLR(D) 328
Bailii, WLRD
Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004 113(3)
England and Wales

Planning, Local Government

Updated: 02 January 2022; Ref: scu.550379

Cunningham, Regina (on The Application of) v Hertfordshire County Council and Another: Admn 8 Jul 2015

The Claimant challenges the failure of the Defendant local authority to provide her with support in her care of a looked after child, namely her grandson, R, in breach of its duty so to do under sections 20-23 of the Children Act 1989.

Kickinbottom J
[2015] EWHC 1936 (Admin)
Bailii
Children Act 1989 20 21 22 23

Children, Local Government

Updated: 02 January 2022; Ref: scu.550017

Cornwall Council, Regina (on The Application of) v Secretary of State for Health and Somerset County Council: SC 8 Jul 2015

PH had severe physical and learning disabilities and was without speech, lacking capacity to decide for himself where to live. Since the age of four he received accommodation and support at public expense. Until his majority in December 2004, he was living with foster parents in South Gloucestershire. He then lived in two care homes in the Somerset area. There was no dispute about his entitlement to that support, initially under the Children Act 1989, and since his majority under the National Assistance Act 1948. The issue was which authority should be responsible?
Held: The appeal was allowed (Wilson L dissenting). The decision-maker’s reasons for selecting Cornwall cannot be supported. The writer started, not from an assessment of the duration and quality of PH’s actual residence in any of the competing areas, but from an attempt to ascertain his ‘base’, by reference to his relationships with those concerned. In deciding what was the ordinary residence of an adult without mental capacity to allow a decision as to where he might live, the test was not whether because of incapacity he was to be treated as might a child and that his ordinary residence was that of his parents, despite his only occasional visits with them.

Lady Hale, Deputy President, Lord Wilson, Lord Carnwath, Lord Hughes, Lord Toulson
[2015 UKSC 46, [2015] WLR(D) 298, [2015] BLGR 503, [2015] HLR 32, [2015] 3 FCR 347, [2016] AC 137, (2015) 18 CCL Rep 497, [2015] 3 WLR 213, (2015) 145 BMLR 1, UKSC 2014/0092, UKSC 2014/0109
Bailii, WLRD, Bailii Summary, SC, SC Summary
Children Act 1989, National Assistance Act 1948 21, Ordinary Residence Disputes (National Assistance Act 1948) Directions 2010
England and Wales
Citing:
At first InstanceCornwall Council, Regina (on The Application of) v Wiltshire Council and Others Admn 21-Dec-2012
Dispute as to which council had obligation to support a young disabled man. . .
Appeal fromCornwall Council, Regina (on The Application of) v Secretary of State for Health and Others CA 18-Feb-2014
The court considered how local authorities were to decide whether a citizen due to receive certain kinds of assistance was resident in or had the closest connection with a particular authority. In this particular case the issue arose in respect of a . .
CitedIn re P (GE) (An infant) CA 1965
A stateless child was taken by his father away from the mother in England to Israel.
Held: The wardship jurisdiction of the Court of Chancery extended to any child ‘ordinarily resident’ in this country. An infant of British nationality whether . .
CitedRegina v Barnet London Borough Council, Ex parte Shah HL 16-Dec-1982
The five applicants had lived in the UK for at least three years while attending school or college. All five were subject to immigration control, four had entered as students with limited leave to remain for the duration of their studies, and the . .
CitedRegina v Waltham Forest, Ex parte Vale 11-Feb-1985
The court had to decide what was the ordinary reference under the 1948 of an adult without capacity. V had been in residential care in Ireland for over 20 years, but having left there had been with her mother for two weeks. The parties argued the . .
CitedMohamed v Hammersmith and Fulham London Borough Council HL 1-Nov-2001
Mrs M came to England in 1994 living first in Ealing and then Hammersmith. Mr M came later and lived elsewhere in Hammersmith. Hammersmith gave them jointly temporary accommodation, first in a hotel and then in a flat. They then applied under . .
CitedHertfordshire County Council, Regina (on The Application of) v JM CA 15-Feb-2011
The court was asked which local authority had responsibility to provide support to a patient on his discharge after a period of detention under section 3 of the 1983 Act. . .
CitedA v A and another (Children) (Children: Habitual Residence) (Reunite International Child Abduction Centre intervening) SC 9-Sep-2013
Acquisition of Habitual Residence
Habitual residence can in principle be lost and another habitual residence acquired on the same day.
Held: The provisions giving the courts of a member state jurisdiction also apply where there is an alternative jurisdiction in a non-member . .
CitedInland Revenue v Cadwalader 1904
An American citizen, with his ordinary residence and indeed practising the law in New York, took a three-year lease of a furnished shooting lodge in Scotland. He resided at the shooting lodge for a period of two months in each year during the . .
CitedLevene v Inland Revenue Commissioners HL 1928
Until 1919 Mr. Levene had been both resident and ordinarily resident in the UK. Then, for five years he spent about five months (mainly in the summer) each year, staying in hotels in the UK and receiving medical attention or pursuing religious and . .
CitedInland Revenue Commissioners v Lysaght HL 1928
The taxpayer, who was living in Ireland would come regularly to England for a total of less than three months a year, and would spend a week or so in a hotel for the purpose of board meetings. The House considered the meaning of the requirement of . .
CitedIn re F (Mental Patient: Sterilisation) HL 4-May-1989
Where a patient lacks capacity, there is the power to provide him with whatever treatment or care is necessary in his own best interests. Medical treatment can be undertaken in an emergency even if, through a lack of capacity, no consent had been . .
CitedRegina v G and R HL 16-Oct-2003
The defendants, young boys, had set fire to paper and thrown the lit papers into a wheelie bin, expecting the fire to go out. In fact substantial damage was caused. The House was asked whether a conviction was proper under the section where the . .

Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Benefits, Local Government

Updated: 02 January 2022; Ref: scu.549905

Kay and Another v London Borough of Lambeth and others; Leeds City Council v Price and others and others: HL 8 Mar 2006

In each case the local authority sought to recover possession of its own land. In the Lambeth case, they asserted this right as against an overstaying former tenant, and in the Leeds case as against gypsies. In each case the occupiers said that the recovery of possession interfered with their right respect for their family life.
Held: Article 8 could not be invoked by an occupier of a residential property in support of his case against his landlord’s claim for possession, because domestic law had already taken into account, and balanced, the public interest in a public authority landlord obtaining possession and the tenant’s right to respect for his home.
The House considered apparent conflicts between its own jurisprudence in Qazi, and that of the European Court of Human Rights.
Leeds CC sought possession of land occupied by gypsies without plannng permission, and the occupiers said that their right to family life had been infringed. The council said its right to possession was absolute. The authority’s right to reclaim the land was absolute in accordance with domestic property law, save only that the occupier must be given opportunity to present any art 8 defence which it for the occupier to raise through court proceedings. The recreation ground had not become the appellants’ home within article 8.
Lord Bingham emphasised the importance and value of adhering to precedent in the interests of certainty and clarity. This meant that our domestic rules of precedent should apply, even in the Convention context.
In the second appeal, tenancies had been purported to be granted when the purported landlord was merely a licensee and did not have a sufficient legal interest to create a legal estate: ‘the courts below should have held the premises in question to be the homes of the respective appellants and should have held their eviction or proposed eviction to be an interference with their exercise of their right to respect for their homes within the meaning of article 8(2). Their defences should not have been struck out save on the basis that nothing sufficient was pleaded to support them. ‘
Lord Hope of Craighead: ‘a defence which does not challenge the law under which the possession order is sought as being incompatible with the article 8 but is based only on the occupier’s personal circumstances should be struck out.’ The reasoning in the Qazi case need not not be departed from to accommodate the European jurisprudence.

Lord Bingham of Cornhill, Lord Nicholls Of Birkenhead, Lord Hope of Craighead, Lord Scott of Foscote, Lord Walker of Gestingthorpe, Baroness Hale of Richmond, Lord Brown of Eaton-under-Heywood
[2006] UKHL 10, Times 10-Mar-2006, [2006] 2 WLR 570, [2006] 2 AC 465
Bailii
Homelessness Act 2002, Race Relations Act 1976;, European Convention on Human Rights 8
England and Wales
Citing:
CitedLondon Borough of Harrow v Qazi HL 31-Jul-2003
The applicant had held a joint tenancy of the respondent. His partner gave notice and left, and the property was taken into possession. The claimant claimed restoration of his tenancy saying the order did not respect his right to a private life and . .
Appeal fromKay, Gorman, etc v London Borough of Lambeth, London and Quadrant Housing Trust CA 20-Jul-2004
The defendant local authority had licenced houses to a housing trust, which in turn granted sub-licences to the claimants who were applicants for housing under homelessness provisions, and who now asserted that they became secure tenants of the . .
CitedConnors v The United Kingdom ECHR 27-May-2004
The applicant gypsies had initially been permitted to locate their caravan on a piece of land owned by a local authority, but their right of occupation was brought to an end because the local authority considered that they were committing a . .
CitedS v United Kingdom ECHR 1986
The applicant was not entitled in domestic law to succeed to a tenancy on the death of her partner. The aim of the legislation is question was to protect the family, a goal similar to the protection of the right to respect for family life guaranteed . .
CitedRegina v Boyd, Hastie, Spear (Courts Martial Appeal Court), Regina v Saunby, Clarkson, English, Williams, Dodds, and others HL 18-Jul-2002
Corts Martial System Complant with Human Rights
The applicants were each convicted by courts martial of offences under civil law. They claimed that the courts martial were not independent tribunals because of the position of the president of the court, and that it was wrong to try a serviceman by . .
CitedBlecic v Croatia ECHR 29-Jul-2004
The applicant had for many years before 1992 had a protected tenancy of a publicly-owned flat in Zadar. Under Croatian law a specially-protected tenancy might be terminated if the tenant ceased to occupy the flat for a continuous period of six . .
Appeal fromPrice and others v Leeds City Council CA 16-Mar-2005
The defendant gypsies had moved their caravans onto land belonging to the respondents without planning permission. They appealed an order to leave saying that the order infringed their rights to respect for family life.
Held: There had been . .
CitedUre v United Kingdom ECHR 27-Nov-1996
The applicant’s tenancy came to an end on expiry of a notice to quit given by his wife, formerly a joint tenant with him, and possession was ordered. The Commission held that his complaint under article 8 was manifestly ill-founded because the . .
CitedO’Rourke v United Kingdom ECHR 26-Jun-2001
The applicant was a sex offender who on release from prison had found temporary accommodation from which he had been evicted for pestering female residents. He ignored advice to go to a night shelter whilst a decision on permanent re-housing was . .
CitedMarzari v Italy ECHR 1999
The applicant suffered from metabolic myopathy and was 100 per cent disabled. He was allocated an apartment which he considered inadequate. He ceased paying rent for it, demanding that certain works be carried out to make it suitable for him to live . .
CitedBuckley v The United Kingdom ECHR 25-Sep-1996
The Commission had concluded, by a narrow majority, that the measures taken by the respondent in refusing planning permission and enforcing planning orders were excessive and disproportionate, even allowing a margin of appreciation enjoyed by the . .
CitedRegina v Huntingdon District Council, Ex parte Cowan QBD 1984
The plaintiff sought judicial review of a refusal of a local authority to grant a liquor licence and a music and dancing licence. Review was sought despite a right of appeal to the Magistrates Court.
Held: If other means of redress are . .
CitedWandsworth London Borough Council v Winder HL 1985
Rent demands were made by a local authority landlord on one of its tenants. The local authority, using its powers under the Act, resolved to increase rents generally. The tenant refused to pay the increased element of the rent. He argued that the . .
CitedMcLellan v Bracknell Forest Borough Council; Reigate Borough Council v Benfield and Another CA 16-Oct-2001
The tenant was issued with a notice to quit for unpaid rent, within the first year, during an ‘introductory tenancy.’ She sought judicial review on the basis that the reduced security of tenure infringed her human rights.
Held: Review was . .
CitedPoplar Housing and Regeneration Community Association Ltd v Donoghue CA 27-Apr-2001
The defendant resisted accelerated possession proceedings brought for rent arrears under his assured shorthold tenancy, by a private housing association who was a successor to a public authority.
Held: Once the human rights issue was raised, . .
CitedMabey v United Kingdom ECHR 1996
A claimant must show a sufficient and continuing link with a place in order to establish that it is his home for purposes of article 8. . .
CitedBoddington v British Transport Police HL 2-Apr-1998
The defendant had been convicted, under regulations made under the Act, of smoking in a railway carriage. He sought to challenge the validity of the regulations themselves. He wanted to argue that the power to ban smoking on carriages did not . .
CitedSmart v Sheffield City Council: Central Sunderland Housing Company Limited v Wilson CA 25-Jan-2002
Each tenant had become unintentionally homeless, and was granted a non-secure tenancy of accommodation under section 193. Complaints of nuisance were received from neighbours. Possession orders were obtained and now challenged under the Human Rights . .
CitedMichalak v London Borough of Wandsworth CA 6-Mar-2002
The appellant had occupied for a long time a room in a house let by the authority. After the death of the tenant, the appellant sought, but was refused, a statutory tenancy. He claimed to be a member of the tenant’s family, and that the list of . .
CitedLondon Street Tramways v London County Council HL 25-Apr-1898
House Decisions binding on Itself
The House laid down principles for the doctrine of precedent. When faced with the hypothesis that a case might have been decided in ignorance of the existence of some relevant statutory provision or in reliance on some statutory provision which was . .
CitedPractice Statement (Judicial Precedent) HL 1966
The House gave guidance how it would treat an invitation to depart from a previous decision of the House. Such a course was possible, but the direction was not an ‘open sesame’ for a differently constituted committee to prefer their views to those . .
CitedCassell and Co Ltd v Broome and Another HL 23-Feb-1972
Exemplary Damages Award in Defamation
The plaintiff had been awarded damages for defamation. The defendants pleaded justification. Before the trial the plaintiff gave notice that he wanted additional, exemplary, damages. The trial judge said that such a claim had to have been pleaded. . .
CitedMcPhail v Persons, Names Unknown CA 1973
The court was asked to make an order against persons unknown in order to recover land. Although an owner of land which was being occupied by squatters was entitled to take the remedy into his own hand, he was encouraged to go to a common law court . .
CitedParochial Church Council of the Parish of Aston Cantlow and Wilmcote with Billesley, Warwickshire v Wallbank and another HL 26-Jun-2003
Parish Councils are Hybrid Public Authorities
The owners of glebe land were called upon as lay rectors to contribute to the cost of repairs to the local church. They argued that the claim was unlawful by section 6 of the 1998 Act as an act by a public authority incompatible with a Convention . .
CitedGillow v The United Kingdom ECHR 24-Nov-1986
The housing authority in Guernsey refused to allow the applicants to occupy the house they owned there.
Held: The house in question was the applicants’ home because, although they had been absent from Guernsey for many years, they had not . .
CitedP v United Kingdom ECHR 12-Dec-1990
The applicants had been evicted, following the service of a notice to quit, from a caravan site where they had lived for many years. The respondent admitted that the eviction constituted an interference with the applicants’ right to respect for . .
CitedMellor v Watkins 1874
Allen held a yearly tenancy of premises subject to a yearly sub-tenancy of part. The sub-tenancy was afterwards acquired by the defendant. Allen surrendered his tenancy to the freeholder who re-let the premises to the plaintiff. Neither the tenancy . .
CitedPennell v Payne CA 1995
The operation of the break clause in a lease will (in the absence of provision to the contrary) have the effect of terminating not just the lease but also the underlease, and any inferior sub-tenancies. . .
CitedFitzleet Estates Ltd v Cherry HL 9-Nov-1977
Income tax – Schedule D, Cases III and VI – Payments of interest and ground rent incurred when property was being developed – Whether capitalised or paid out of profits or gains brought into charge to tax – Income Tax Act 1952 (15 and 16 Geo. 6 and . .
CitedJames Casey and others v Crawley Borough Council Admn 1-Mar-2006
The range of considerations which any public authority should take into account in deciding whether to invoke its powers can be very wide. . .
CitedDi Palma v United Kingdom ECHR 1-Dec-1986
(Commission/admissibility) The applicant’s lease was forfeited on her non-payment of a service charge and possession was ordered. Her primary claim was made (unsuccessfully) under article 1 of the First Protocol to the Convention. But she also . .
CitedRegina v Special Adjudicator ex parte Ullah; Regina v Secretary of State for the Home Department HL 17-Jun-2004
The applicants had had their requests for asylum refused. They complained that if they were removed from the UK, their article 3 rights would be infringed. If they were returned to Pakistan or Vietnam they would be persecuted for their religious . .
CitedLarkos v Cyprus ECHR 18-Feb-1999
The applicant had rented a house from the government, but was ordered to vacate the house following revocation of his tenancy. Because he had been a tenant of the government he was not, under domestic law, entitled to the security which he would . .
CitedRegina v Lincolnshire County Council Ex Parte Atkinson; Regina v Wealden District Council Ex Parte Wales and Others QBD 3-Oct-1995
A local Authority must make proper welfare enquiries before seeking to remove unlawful campers. The new draconic legislation must be seen in its context. The commons of England provided lawful stopping places for people whose way of life was or had . .
CitedUre v United Kingdom ECHR 27-Nov-1996
The applicant’s tenancy came to an end on expiry of a notice to quit given by his wife, formerly a joint tenant with him, and possession was ordered. The Commission held that his complaint under article 8 was manifestly ill-founded because the . .

Cited by:
CitedPirabakaran v Patel and Another CA 26-May-2006
The landlord had wanted possession. The tenant said that the landlord had been harassing him. The landlord said that the tenancy was a mixed residential and business tenancy and that the 1977 Act did not apply.
Held: The 1977 Act applied. A . .
CitedPirabakaran v Patel and Another CA 26-May-2006
The landlord had wanted possession. The tenant said that the landlord had been harassing him. The landlord said that the tenancy was a mixed residential and business tenancy and that the 1977 Act did not apply.
Held: The 1977 Act applied. A . .
CitedC Plc and W v P and Secretary of State for the Home Office and the Attorney General ChD 26-May-2006
cplc_pChD2006
The claimant sought damages from the first defendant for breach of copyright. An ex parte search order had been executed, with the defendant asserting his privilege against self-incrimination. As computer disks were examined, potentially unlawful . .
CitedDesnousse v London Borough of Newham and others CA 17-May-2006
The occupier had been granted a temporary licence by the authority under the homelessness provisions whilst it made its assessment. The assessment concluded that she had become homeless intentionally, and therefore terminated the licence and set out . .
CitedBoyland and Son Ltd v Rand and Others CA 20-Dec-2006
The defendant squatters sought leave to appeal an order for immediate possession.
Held: (As citeable authority) MacPhail remained good law despite the passing of the 1980 Act, and an order for immediate possession was correct. . .
CitedHuang v Secretary of State for the Home Department HL 21-Mar-2007
Appellate Roles – Human Rights – Families Split
The House considered the decision making role of immigration appellate authorities when deciding appeals on Human Rights grounds, against refusal of leave to enter or remain, under section 65. In each case the asylum applicant had had his own . .
CitedC Plc v P and Attorney General Intervening CA 22-May-2007
The respondent had been subject to a civil search, which revealed the existence of obscene images of children on his computer. He appealed against refusal of an order that the evidence should not be passed to the police as evidence. He said that the . .
CitedBuckley v Dalziel QBD 3-May-2007
There was a heated dispute between neighbours, culminating in some generous or perhaps over-generous pruning by the claimant of the defendant’s trees and shrubs on the boundaries. The defendants reported the matter to the police. Both Mr and Mrs . .
CitedYL v Birmingham City Council and Others HL 20-Jun-2007
The House was asked whether a private care home when providing accommodation and care to a resident under arrangements with a local authority the 1948 Act, is performing ‘functions of a public nature’ for the purposes of section 6(3)(b) of the Human . .
CitedSandwell Metropolitan Borough Council v Hensley CA 1-Nov-2007
The secure tenant was convicted of cultivating cannabis in the house. The council sought possession, and now appealed an order granting only possession suspended whilst the tenant complied with the terms of the tenancy agreement, seeking outright . .
CitedMurray v Big Pictures (UK) Ltd; Murray v Express Newspapers CA 7-May-2008
The claimant, a famous writer, complained on behalf of her infant son that he had been photographed in a public street with her, and that the photograph had later been published in a national newspaper. She appealed an order striking out her claim . .
CitedBoyland and Son Ltd v Rand CA 20-Dec-2006
The defendant travellers occupied land belonging to the claimants. A possession order had been obtained, and the defendants now sought a reasonable time to be allowed to leave.
Held: The law had not changed, and section 89 could not be used to . .
CitedPurdy, Regina (on the Application of) v Director of Public Prosecutions and Another QBD 29-Oct-2008
The applicant suffered mutiple sclerosis and considered that she might wish to go abroad to end her life. She asked the court to make more clear the guidance provided by the Director as to whether her partner might be prosecuted under section 2(1) . .
CitedAli v Birmingham City Council CA 7-Nov-2008
The Council said that it had discharged its duty to house the claimants after they had refused an offer of accommodation, and that decision had been reviewed. The claimant denied receiving a notice under the procedure. The court was asked whether . .
CitedPurdy, Regina (on the Application of) v Director of Public Prosecutions and Another Admn 29-Oct-2008
The applicant said that the defendant had unlawfully failed to provide detailed guidance under section 10 of the 1985 Act, on the circumstances under which a prosecution might lie of a person performing acts which might assist another to commit . .
CitedKnowsley Housing Trust v White; Honeygan-Green v London Borough of Islington; Porter v Shepherds Bush Housing Association HL 10-Dec-2008
The House considered situations where a secure or assured tenancy had been made subject to a suspended possession order and where despite the tenant failing to comply with the conditions, he had been allowed to continue in occupation.
Held: . .
CitedTruro Diocesan Board of Finance Ltd v Foley CA 22-Oct-2008
The tenant appealed against a decision that a deed he had entered into with the claimant did not operate to give him the status of a protected or statutory tenancy.
Held: The tenant had had a full Rent Act tenancy. The Board claimed . .
CitedPurdy, Regina (on the Application of) v Director of Public Prosecutions and others CA 19-Feb-2009
The claimant suffered a debilitating terminal disease. She anticipated going to commit suicide at a clinic in Switzerland, and wanted first a clear policy so that her husband who might accompany her would know whether he might be prosecuted under . .
CitedMcGlynn v Welwyn Hatfield District Council CA 1-Apr-2009
The appellant was a non-secure tenant of the respondent. It had served a notice to quit and he now appealed against an order for possession on public law grounds.
Held: There had been a delay between the issue of the notice to quit and the . .
See AlsoKay and others v Lambeth SCCO 2-Jan-2007
. .
CitedPurdy, Regina (on the Application of) v Director of Public Prosecutions HL 30-Jul-2009
Need for Certainty in Scope of Offence
The appellant suffered a severe chronic illness and anticipated that she might want to go to Switzerland to commit suicide. She would need her husband to accompany her, and sought an order requiring the respondent to provide clear guidelines on the . .
CitedCentral Bedfordshire Council v Housing Action Zone Ltd, Taylor and Others; Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government intervening CA 23-Jun-2009
The authority had granted a lease to a housing society who had in turn granted the occupants’ leases. A successor then revoked the head lease. The occupiers appealed against possession orders, saying that they had come to acquire article 8 rights in . .
CitedBarber v London Borough of Croydon CA 11-Feb-2010
The tenant who suffered learning and behavioural difficulties appealed against an order for possession of his council flat. He had become aggressive with the caretaker. The council sought possession, and he defended the claim saying that the council . .
CitedJoseph v Nettleton Road Housing Co-Operative Ltd CA 16-Mar-2010
The respondent was a mutual housing co-operative, and the claimant its tenant. The tenant kept a dog in the premises without the consent of the other tenants in breach of the terms of the lease. A notice to quit was served on him. His tenancy was . .
CitedSalford City Council v Mullen CA 30-Mar-2010
The court considered the status of decisions to commence proceedings for possession by local authorities against tenants not protected under any statutory scheme. The tenants, on introductory tenancies and under the homelessness regime, argued that . .
MentionedValentines Homes and Construction Ltd, Regina (on The Application of) v HM Revenue and Customs CA 31-Mar-2010
The claimant had applied for judicial review of a decision by the defendant to seek to recover a debt from them. The issue had however been settled in the County Court. Costs were ordered against them, and they now appealed. In a small company the . .
CitedCoombes, Regina (on The Application of) v Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government and Another Admn 8-Mar-2010
The landlord council brought proceedings for possession. The tenant (C) had remained in possession after his mother’s death, but enjoyed no second statutory succession. He had lived there since 1954 when he was six. C sought a declaration of . .
CitedHall and Others v Mayor of London (on Behalf of The Greater London Authority) CA 16-Jul-2010
The appellants sought leave to appeal against an order for possession of Parliament Square on which the claimants had been conducting a demonstration (‘the Democracy Village’).
Held: Leave was refused save for two appellants whose cases were . .
CitedRegina (GC) v Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis; Regina (C) v Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis Admn 16-Jul-2010
The claimants had each had biometric samples taken during police investigations, and now sought judicial review of the decision of the respondent not to remove those details from the Police National Computer, saying that in accordance with the . .
CitedManchester City Council v Pinnock SC 3-Nov-2010
The tenant had been secure but had his tenancy had been reduced to an insecure demoted tenancy after he was accused of anti-social behaviour. He had not himself been accused of any misbehaviour, but it was said that he should have controlled his . .
CitedLondon Borough of Hounslow v Powell, Leeds City Council v Hall etc SC 23-Feb-2011
In each case the tenant occupied the property as his home, but was not a secure tenant of the local authority. The Court was asked whether, in granting a possession order in such a case, the court was obliged to consider the proportionality of the . .
CitedYoung, Regina (on The Application of) v Governor of Her Majesty’s Prison Highdown and Another Admn 6-Apr-2011
The claimant complained that he had not been considered for early release on Home Detention Curfew because the policy refused to allow those convicted of knife crimes to be so considered, and: ‘the failure to include other offences in the list of . .
CitedHowarth v Commissioner of Police of The Metropolis QBD 3-Nov-2011
howarth_cmpQBD2011
The claimant sought judicial review of a decision to search him whilst travelling to a public protest in London. A previous demonstration involving this group had resulted in criminal damage, but neither the claimant nor his companions were found to . .
CitedManchester City Council v Pinnock SC 9-Feb-2011
The council tenant had wished to appeal following a possession order made after her tenancy had been demoted. The court handed down a supplemental judgment to give effect to its earlier decision. The Court had been asked ‘whether article 8 of the . . .
CitedRobinson, Regina (on The Application of) v HMP Whatton and Another Admn 4-Dec-2013
Two prisoners serving sentences of imprisonment for public protection sought judicial review of arrangements meaning that they had not been given a timely opportunity to demonstrate to the Parole Board that they are safe to be released. Their . .
CitedKaiyam, Regina (on The Application of) v The Secretary of State for Justice CA 9-Dec-2013
The court was asked as to claims arising from the continued detention of the appellants following the expiry of the ‘minimum terms’ or ‘tariff periods’ of their indeterminate terms of imprisonment. The appellant prisoners said that the respondent’s . .
CitedHaney and Others, Regina (on The Application of) v The Secretary of State for Justice SC 10-Dec-2014
The four claimants, each serving indeterminate prison sentences, said that as they approached the times when thy might apply for parol, they had been given insufficient support and training to meet the requirements for release. The courts below had . .
CitedAkerman-Livingstone v Aster Communities Ltd SC 11-Mar-2015
Appeal about the proper approach of the courts where the defendant to a claim for possession of his home raises a defence of unlawful discrimination, contrary to the Equality Act 2010, by the claimant landlord. In particular, the issue is whether . .
CitedHallam, Regina (on The Application of) v Secretary of State for Justice SC 30-Jan-2019
These appeals concern the statutory provisions governing the eligibility for compensation of persons convicted of a criminal offence where their conviction is subsequently quashed (or they are pardoned) because of the impact of fresh evidence. It . .

Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Human Rights, Housing, Local Government, Constitutional

Leading Case

Updated: 01 January 2022; Ref: scu.238921

Credit Suisse v Allerdale Borough Council: QBD 17 Jun 1994

A Local Authority’s guarantee for its own company was void, having been given for impermissible reasons.

Independent 17-Jun-1994
England and Wales
Cited by:
Appeal fromCredit Suisse v Allerdale Borough Council CA 20-May-1996
Builder’s Guarantee Ultra Vires LA
The council set out to provide a swimming pool using powers under s.19 of the 1976 Act. Purporting to use powers under s.111 of the 1972 Act, it set up a company to develop a site by building a leisure pool and time-share units, with a view to . .

Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Local Government, Banking

Updated: 31 December 2021; Ref: scu.79618

Credit Suisse v Allerdale Borough Council: CA 20 May 1996

Builder’s Guarantee Ultra Vires LA

The council set out to provide a swimming pool using powers under s.19 of the 1976 Act. Purporting to use powers under s.111 of the 1972 Act, it set up a company to develop a site by building a leisure pool and time-share units, with a view to selling the time-share units to pay for the cost of building the pool. The council gave a guarantee to help the company to finance the project, and on the strength of this the company obtained a facility from the bank. The sale of the time-share units proved unsatisfactory and the company went into liquidation. The bank sued the council under the guarantee to recover the sums owed to it by the company.
Held: The guarantee was ultra vires where it had been given to a company when the authority was acting outside it’s proper powers. Where a statutory corporation purports to enter into a contract which it is not empowered by the relevant statute to enter into, the corporation lacks the capacity to make the supposed contract. This lack of capacity means that the document and the agreement it contains do not have effect as a legal contract. It exists in fact but not in law. It is a legal nullity. The purported contract which is in truth not a contract does not confer any legal rights on either party. Neither party can sue on it. Any third party dealing with a local authority should be aware of that fact [of limited capacity and competence] and of the potential legal risk.
Hobhouse LJ said: ‘The discretion of the court in deciding whether to grant any remedy is wide one. It can take into account many considerations, including the needs of good administration, delay, the effect on third parties, and the utility of granting the relevant remedy.’

Hobhouse LJ
Times 20-May-1996, [1997] QB 306
Local Government Act 1972 111, Local Government (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1976 819
England and Wales
Citing:
Appeal fromCredit Suisse v Allerdale Borough Council QBD 17-Jun-1994
A Local Authority’s guarantee for its own company was void, having been given for impermissible reasons. . .
AppliedLondon and Clydeside Estates v Aberdeen District Council HL 8-Nov-1979
Identifying ‘maandatory’ and ‘regulatory’
The appellants had sought a Certificate of Alternative Development. The certificate provided was defective in that it did not notify the appellants, as required, of their right to appeal. Their appeal out of time was refused.
Held: The House . .

Cited by:
CitedStretch v The United Kingdom ECHR 24-Jun-2003
The claimant had taken a lease of property from a local authority. Relying upon an option for renewal, he invested substantially in the property, but it was then decided that the option was ultra vires.
Held: Property rights protected under . .
CitedRegina v Soneji and Bullen HL 21-Jul-2005
The defendants had had confiscation orders made against them. They had appealed on the basis that the orders were made more than six months after sentence. The prosecutor now appealed saying that the fact that the order were not timely did not . .
CitedKilby v Basildon District Council Admn 26-Jul-2006
Tenants complained that the authority landlord had purported to vary a clause in his secure tenancy agreement which gave certain management rights to tenants.
Held: The powers to let on secure tenancies were governed by statute. The clause . .
CitedBirmingham City Council v Qasim and Others CA 20-Oct-2009
The council argued that the defendant was not a tenant granted to him as a secure tenancy since he had not been granted the tenancy in accordance with its policies. An employee had manipulated the Council’s system to grant tenancies to bypass the . .
CitedUKI (Kingsway) Ltd v Westminster City Council SC 17-Dec-2018
Short issue as to the requirements for valid ‘service’ of a completion notice so as to bring a newly completed building within liability for non-domestic rates. The notice had been served by email where no statutory authority existed for this.
Local Government, Contract, Company, Banking

Updated: 31 December 2021; Ref: scu.79620

Clarke, Regina (on The Application of) v London Borough of Sutton: Admn 23 Apr 2015

The claimant, a 27 year old with severe epilepsy and other mental health and behavioural difficulties had had living care support provided by Enfield. He then became ‘ordinarily resident’ in the defendant’s area and the defendant became responsible for his care. He now challenged the defendant’s decision not to continue to fund the specialist placement formerly funded by Enfield and as to the lawfulness of the assessment as to his needs.

Sycamore HHJ
[2015] EWHC 1081 (Admin)
Bailii

Local Government, Health

Updated: 29 December 2021; Ref: scu.545929

Heron Bros Ltd v Central Bedfordshire Council: TCC 20 Mar 2015

Application to strike out a claim on the ground that the claim form was not served within the prescribed time limit. The claim is a procurement challenge in which the Claimant claims damages and a declaration of ineffectiveness in respect of the award of a contract by the Defendant for the construction of a leisure centre in its area. The contract has been signed and construction is underway.
Held: Though bad in form the failings were properly to be cured by amendment.

Edwards-Stuart J
[2015] EWHC 604 (TCC), [2015] PTSR 1146, [2015] WLR(D) 137
Bailii, WLRD
Public Contracts Regulations 2006
England and Wales
Cited by:
See AlsoHeron Bros Ltd v Central Bedfordshire Council (No 2) TCC 17-Apr-2015
. .

Lists of cited by and citing cases may be incomplete.

Construction, Local Government, Limitation

Updated: 29 December 2021; Ref: scu.544615

Worcestershire County Council -v- Secretary of State for Health and Social Care: CA 22 Dec 2021

dispute about which of two local authorities should pay for care services, in this case after-care services pursuant to s.117(3) of the Mental Health Act 1983

Lord Justice Coulson,
Lady Justice Carr,
And,
Lord Justice William Davis
[2021] EWCA Civ 1957
Bailii, Judiciary
England and Wales

Health, Local Government

Updated: 28 December 2021; Ref: scu.670716

Kent County Council, Regina (on The Application of) v The Secretary of State for Health and Others: CA 11 Feb 2015

The court was asked as to which of a number of local authorities should be responsible for funding the residential accommodation of a disabled adult pursuant to section 21 of the 1948 Act. In particular, it concerns the proper construction of section 24(5) which deems a person to be ordinarily resident in a local authority area when he is in fact ordinarily resident elsewhere.

Lord Dyson MR, Tomlinson, Burnett LJJ
[2015] EWCA Civ 81
Bailii
National Assistance Act 1948 21 24(5)
England and Wales

Local Government, Benefits

Updated: 27 December 2021; Ref: scu.542484

L and P v Warwickshire County Council: Admn 5 Feb 2015

The claimants are two disabled children complaining of a failure in the public law duty to consult, in that the defendant ‘acted unlawfully in failing to consult properly or at all on the cuts to funding for social care services for disabled children which it intends to introduce when the ‘local offer’ is approved.

Mostyn J
[2015] EWHC 203 (Admin)
Bailii
England and Wales

Local Government

Updated: 27 December 2021; Ref: scu.542271