Wellesley v Duke of Beaufort: 1827

A member of Parliament claimed parliamentary immunity from the consequences of having abducted his child.
Held: The court discussed the origins of the court’s inherent jurisdiction over children and the infirm. Lord Eldon LC said: it belongs to the King as parens patriae, having the care of those who are not able to take care of themselves, and is founded on the obvious necessity that the law should place somewhere the care of individuals who cannot take care of themselves, particularly in cases where it is clear that some care should be thrown around them.’
Lord Eldon LC
(1827) 2 Russ 1
England and Wales
Cited by:
See AlsoWellesley v The Duke Of Beaufort; Mr Long Wellesley’s Case 28-Jul-1831
A member of Parliament asserted parliamentary immunity from the consequences of having abducted his child. Lord Brougham LC said: ‘how incumbent it is upon the courts of law to defend their high and sacred duty of guarding the lives, the liberties, . .
CitedChaytor and Others, Regina v SC 1-Dec-2010
The defendants faced trial on charges of false accounting in connection in different ways with their expenses claims whilst serving as members of the House of Commons. They appealed against rejection of their assertion that the court had no . .

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Updated: 09 May 2021; Ref: scu.200664