Re Resch’s Will Trusts; Vera Caroline Le Crasv Perpetual Trustee Company Limited: PC 19 Oct 1967

(New South Wales) The testator left a series of testamentary provisions including gifts which worked cumulatively. Lord Wilberforce discussed the breadth of evidence admissible in the probate court: ‘The principles which ought to be applied on such a question is this, by a court of construction, as compared with those applicable by a court of probate have been clearly stated by Sir John Nicholl. ‘In the court of probate the whole question is one of intention: the animus testandi and the animus revocandi are completely open to investigation’ . . and ‘in a court of construction, where the factum of the instrument has been previously established in the court of probate, the enquiry is pretty closely restricted to the contents of the instrument itself, in order to ascertain the intentions of the testator’: Greenough v Martin (1824) 2 Add 239 at 243′.
Hodson, Guest, Donovan, Wilerforce LL, Sir Alfred North
[1967] 3 All ER 915, [1968] 3 WLR 1153, [1969] 1 AC 514, [1967] UKPC 23
Bailii
Australia
Citing:
CitedVerge v Somerville PC 1924
On an appeal from New South Wales, The Board considered the validity of a gift ‘to the trustees’ of the Repatriation Fund or other similar fund for the benefit of New South Wales returned soldiers’.
Held: Trusts for education and religion do . .
CitedGreenough v Martin 1824
A will and codicil pronounced for; and three intermediate codicils, propounded on behalf of legatees in the same, held to be invalid. In a Court of Probate, what instruments the testator meant to operate as, and compose, his will, is to be collected . .
CitedMethuen v Methuen 23-Jun-1817
Sir John Nicholl said: ‘In the court of probate the whole question is one of intention: the animus testandi and the animus recocandi are completely open to investigation.’ . .
ApprovedIn re Hawksley’s Settlement; Black v Tidy 1934
A second will was described as the last will and moreover referred to the first will as the cancelled will, the testatrix having written on a copy of it the word ‘cancelled’.
Held: Neither feature was sufficient to effect a complete revocation . .

Cited by:
CitedLamothe v Lamothe and Others ChD 15-Jun-2006
The deceased had made a will in England but later made a will in Dominica revoking all other wills. After the first death, probate of the first will was taken out in ignorance of the second. The claimant, still in ignorance of the second will, took . .
CitedParkinson v Fawdon ChD 30-Jul-2009
The deceased and his partner had made mirror wills. On the second death it appeared that a named residuary beneficiary did not exist. The claimant, with a similar name said it had intended to name him. The court considered whether it could be . .
CitedLamothe v Lamothe and Others ChD 15-Jun-2006
The deceased had made a will in England but later made a will in Dominica revoking all other wills. After the first death, probate of the first will was taken out in ignorance of the second. The claimant, still in ignorance of the second will, took . .
CitedMarley v Rawlings and Another SC 22-Jan-2014
A husband and wife had each executed the will which had been prepared for the other, owing to an oversight on the part of their solicitor; the question which arose was whether the will of the husband, who died after his wife, was valid. The parties . .

These lists may be incomplete.
Updated: 19 February 2021; Ref: scu.374776